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  • Highland Fling – by Joan Jaffe (Part One)

    We were bound to have trouble in Customs with the muesli, Dick predicted, and maybe the half jar of jam and the 47 teabags; but I said they were souvenirs and I would relive our Scottish ...

  • Highland Fling – by Joan Jaffe (Part Two)

    The charm of hiking in the Highlands is the other side of the difficulty: that is, the mostly trackless walks, the obscure destinations only intimated by vague directions, the signless ...

  • Lakes & Lochs of the Trossachs Region

    Often referred to with the affectionate moniker of “the highlands in miniature”, the Trossachs region of Scotland offers much of the natural beauty and exciting history of Scotland as a ...

  • Bathgate’s History at the Bennie Museum

    Visitors to Bathgate in West Lothian will find loads of interesting information on the history of the town at the Bennie Museum, situated in two restored cottages on Mansefield Street. The ...

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What to See

  • Castles

    Brechin

    Brechin Castle and the splendid Castle Gardens have been in the Dalhousie Family since the 17th Century. The estate encompasses 55,000 acres of stunning countryside in Angus County. Lord Dalhousie is clan chieftain of Clan Maule of Panmure in Angus and Clan Ramsay of Dalhousie in Midlothian. Brechin Castle stands on a rock bluff above the River Southesk on the site of an older fortress.

  • Orkney

    Scapa Flow

    Scapa Flow on the northern point of Scotland is a renowned natural harbor. This stretch of water is roughly 20 km from east to west and 15km from north to south. Scapa Flow lies within the shelter of the surrounding Orkney Islands. Scapa Flow has been an attraction for more than a thousand years and is known for it beautiful and remote location.

  • Fife

    Cowdenbeath

    The town of Cowdenbeath received its status as a burgh in the year 1890. Many legends and myths have arisen in regard to the name of the town and two stories are most prominent. Some think that it was named after an ancient warlord that resided in this area and others believe that the name was derived from Coilltean Beithe, which translates to Birch Woods. However it was ...

  • Culture

    Language

    More than a thousand years ago, the majority of the Scottish population spoke Gaelic. Today this language is mainly spoken only in the Highlands and Islands. The Gaelic language has become very endangered, although there are still a few elderly people who speak it and a few pop and rock stars even sing in Gaelic. Gaelic enjoys a high cultural status, together with Scottish whisky, ...

  • Literature

    Writers

    Sir James Barrie Sir James Barrie was born on 9 May 1860 in Scotland and died on 19 June 1937 in London, England. He was a dramatist and novelist who was probably best known for his fiction, "Peter Pan", the boy who refused to grow up. He studied at the University of Edinburgh and spent quite some time at the Nottingham Journal before he set off to London as a free-lance writer in ...

  • Castles

    Kilchurn

    There has been a castle at Kilchurn for about 550 years, built on a small island in Loch Awe that is not much bigger than the castle itself. It was probably built by Sir Colin Campbell, first Lord of Glenorchy in about 1450, on the earlier site of a holding of McGregor of Glenstrae. Historically, the main approach to the castle from land has been from Dalmally to the east.

  • Art Galleries

    Smith Art Gallery & Museum

    The Stirling Smith Museum and Art Gallery contains important historical collections that were inherited from collector and painter Thomas Stuart Smith who died in 1869. John Lessels designed the gallery building, which was built on the same grounds as the Stirling Castle and today there is an exhibition dedicated to the Stirling Story.

  • Nature Reserves

    Monach Islands

    The Monach Islands are located just to the west of North Uist. This group of islands is also known as Heisker, and it was said that they were once connected to North Uist. Legend states that a storm of great proportions swept the connecting sandbank back into the ocean, thereby leaving the small islands to the mercy of the great Atlantic Ocean. The once inhabited ...

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