Tag: fife

  • Anstruther

    Anstruther, fondly known by locals as Anster, is the largest settlement in Fife's East Neuk area. This fascinating seaside village is said to have had its beginning back in the Pictish era with solid evidence also dating back to the early Christian church. A lovely picturesque village, Anstruther's busy harbor is watched over by a row of shops and restaurants.

  • St. Andrew's Aquarium

    A mysterious world with its unfathomable depths, marveled at and the subject of intense research, the sea remains less understood by man than outer space is. We are continually awed by the magnitude and might of this secretive aquarium but beneath in the remotest of corners to the open shallows lies a world beyond our comprehension. A little piece of this mystical world is on display at ...

  • Kingsbarns

    The Kingsbarns Golf Links along the North Sea coast has the sea visible from almost all parts of the course. Though it is a new course, its golf origins date back to 1793. Kingsbarn lies between St Andrews and Crail and this unique part of East Fife has sandy soils, undulating ridges and hollows, and even its own burn, the Cambo running into the sea. All this is set immediately against the ...

  • Duke's Golf Course

    Prince Andrew, Duke of York hit the first tee shot at the inaugural match here in 1995, giving the course its name. Duke’s is the only non-links course at St Andrews and is the course built by the Old Course Hotel. Despite its location next to the 17th hole of the Old Course at St Andrews, the hotel could not guarantee its guests tee times there. Hence a new inland course was built for their use.

  • St Andrews

    The ambition of every keen golfer is to play at the St Andrews Old Course in Scotland - in homage to the oldest golf course in the world. Golf has been played here since the fifteenth century. It has consistently remained the best in Scotland and among the top ten in the world. Playing here is not just for a great game but a complete thrilling experience of being in the birthplace of golf ...

  • St Andrews

    St Andrews Castle was not really a castle, but has been the main residence of the bishops and archbishops of St Andrews since the 1200s. It was the seat of power and administration of the Scottish Church and was the location for some of the turning points in the long history of Scotland. As a part of Robert Bruce’s policy the original structure was destroyed by the Scots in 1337 to avoid it ...

  • Kellie

    Kellie Castle is a very fine example of the domestic architecture of Lowland Scotland. It lies two miles inland, northwest, from the charming coastal villages of Pittenweem and St Monan's. The land here rises gently from the north shore of the Firth of Forth to the cairn on top of Kellie Law with dense woods to the south of the castle.

  • Denmylne

    Denmylne Castle gets its name in a curious way. The castle stood near an old water mill on land that was granted by the king to the Balfours. Mylne in Gaelic means mill and it is known as King's Mill as the land was forfeited by the early owners, the Earls of Fife to the Crown. The ruins of the castle can be seen southeast of Newburgh in north Fife, opposite the entrance to a large quarry.

  • Ballinbreich

    The ruins of Ballinbreich Castle can be seen almost three miles east of Newburgh on a steep bank on the southern shore overhanging the Firth of Tay. The ruins stand on private property but it was originally with the ancient Abernathy family before it passed by marriage to the Earls of Rothes. The Earls of Rothes took from it the title Baron Ballinbreich. Ballinbreich is a Celtic word which ...

  • Balgonie

    Balgonie Castle is the oldest tower that is still standing intact in the Kingdom of Fife. Built for Sir Thomas Sibbald of Balgonie around 1360, the baronial castle is situated in the heart of Fife and is perched on a steep bank overhanging the winding River Leven. Balgonie Castle passed to the Lundin or Lundie family through marriage and they were responsible for much of the castle’s expansion.