Tag: castles

  • Kirkwall

    Kirkwall Castle does not exist; but in the fourteenth century it did stand at the present junction between Albert Street, Castle Street and Broad Street. All one can see today is a commemorative plaque on a building on Castle Street in the lovely city of Kirkland on Orkney, Scotland. In the 13th century the islands were ruled by Norse kings and Henry Sinclair, (or St. Clair) a well known ...

  • Urquhart

    There is no better place to wait in hope of catching a glimpse of the Loch Ness Monster, or Nessie, than the ruins of Urquhart Castle. Built on an uneven rocky promontory on the edge of Loch Ness, the castle stood just two miles outside Drumnadrochit in the north of Scotland. Its strategic location guarded the major route to the Highlands.

  • Tioram

    Described by Winston Churchill as one of the most beautiful places he knew, Castle Tioram, pronounced 'Cheerum' is located on a rocky tidal island, Eilean Tioram in Loch Moidart in the Western Highlands on the west coast of Scotland. Tioram is the Gaelic word for dry and the island is only accessible at low tide across a sandy spit. It stands where the waters of Loch Moidart and the river ...

  • Skibo

    Skibo Castle in the Scottish Highlands is one of the most exclusive hotel resorts in Scotland and is home to the prestigious Carnegie Club. It was originally a 13th century stone tower house with a courtyard, built as a residence fortress of Gilbert de Moravia, Bishop of Caithness, and Skibo Castle continued as a residence for Bishops till 1545. Its Gaelic name is Schytherbolle, which means ...

  • Inverness

    Shakespeare’s tragedy ‘Macbeth’ was supposedly based in the earlier 11th century Inverness Castle, the location of Duncan’s murder. The present Inverness Castle may not be witness to anything so dramatic, but as the premises of the Sheriff’s Court it may not be without its own tales of crime and passion.

  • Eilean

    Eilean Donan Castle rises like a silent vision where three Scottish sea lochs, Loch Long, Loch Duich and Loch Alsh meet. The name means Island of Donan, for a hermit St Donan who lived on the island in beginning of the seventh century. The original fort was built on the island of Eilean Donan at least eight hundred years ago but the castle you see today is mostly built in the early 20th century.

  • Dunbeath

    It stands high on a rocky peninsula like a lone white sentinel, overlooking the North Sea that lashes the cliff on all sides. Pristine white-washed walls are topped by romantic turrets and perched over swirling waves. Dunbeath Castle on its estate is situated on the northern tip of Scotland, just south of Wick. A driveway leads through deep, dense woods, past stone pillars and a gatehouse ...

  • Dunvegan

    Dunvegan Castle, located on the Isle of Skye is the pride of the Hebrides. Located 22 miles west of Portree, it has been the home and seat of the Chiefs of MacLeod since the 1200s. Built on a rock that was once entirely surrounded by the sea, it stands on the edge of Loch Dunvegan, the most famous landmark in Skye.

  • Mey

    It was love at first sight. The late Queen Mother of England saw the Castle of Mey for the first time in 1952 while on a visit to Scotland. She was mourning the recent death of her husband, King George VI and the castle, known as Barrogill Castle at that time, immediately charmed her. On hearing it was to be abandoned, she decided to purchase it.

  • Carbisdale

    Carbisdale Castle was built for the controversial, much married Dowager Duchess of Sutherland Lady Mary who was the second wife of George, 3rd Duke and 18th Earl of Sutherland. He bequeathed his entire estate to her on his death, which was contested by her step-son, the 4th Duke. After much litigation and bitterness a settlement was reached whereby the Sutherland family agreed to build a ...