Tag: whisky

  • Auchentoshan

    Auchentoshan Distillery has had many owners in its many decades of existence but its unique characteristic has remained unchanged. Its uniqueness lies in the fact that it is the only distillery in Scotland that triple distills its alcohol. Furthermore, it is one of the few remaining Lowland Malt Whisky Distilleries that are still functioning and flourishing. Most whiskies are distilled twice ...

  • Oban

    The town of Oban in Argyll in the Western Highlands grew around the Oban distillery, one of the oldest in Scotland. Since it was established in 1794, it has played a major role in shaping the lives of the people living around it. The distillery and town were founded by two local brothers John and Hugh Stevenson whose father was a stone mason. The brothers themselves were a builder and a ...

  • Tamdhu Distillery

    In the heart of Speyside, on the banks of the River Spey is a distillery whose name does not begin with Glen…This is Tamdhu, Gaelic for ‘Little Dark Hill’, set in the Spey valley. It was founded in 1897 by a consortium of local distillers and was sold a couple of years later to Highland Distillers, who still own Tamdhu. Lying between Knockando and Archiestown in the Highlands of Scotland, ...

  • Glenlivet

    Will the real Glenlivet please say ‘Cheers?’ The largest selling single malt whisky in the American market is The Glenlivet by Seagram, but there are numerous others with the word Glenlivet in their name. Only the official bottlings of the owning company are allowed to use the appellation ‘The Glenlivet’. The most famous of Speyside single malts, has a further distinguishing phrase on its ...

  • Cardhu Distillery

    Cardhu Distillery was originally known as Cardow. The place where it is located has also been known by variations of the same name. It is now Cardhu but was known in the past as Cardow and Cardoor. It gets its name from the Gaelic word for 'black rock'. The hamlet and the distillery are located in the heart of whisky country – Speyside. The distillery is built along the Knockando River.

  • Royal Lochnagar

    Three years before Queen Victoria bought Balmoral in 1848, the New Lochnagar Distillery was set up on the south side of the River Dee at Craithie. The owner was John Begg and he had added the prefix ‘New’ as there was already a Lochnagar distillery on the north banks of the River Dee. Begg took a chance and invited his new royal neighbors to visit his plant which was half a mile away from ...

  • Laphroaig

    Laphroaig, pronounced ‘la-froyg’, is Gaelic for “the beautiful hollow by the broad bay”. This town lends it name to the exceptional single malt from the tiny Island of Islay off the west coast of Scotland. The inimitable whisky is distilled and bottled by the original founders of the distillery, D. Johnston & Co. The distillery is located in a broad depression on the south coast of Islay, ...

  • Glenrothes Distillery

    Two memorable legends are associated with Glenrothes Distillery. One is about the resident ghost and the other of the great fire which saw whisky flowing down the streets. The latter incident had locals scooping up the amber liquid in whatever they could find and it left the farmers’ cattle and the fish in the Rothes Burn rather tipsy.

  • Edradour

    At Scotland’s smallest distillery three men still makes whisky by hand. At Edradour the original equipment used over 150 years has remained unchanged. Just twelve casks of whisky are produced every week - you really have to be lucky to get a bottle of this rare single malt.

  • Isle Of Jura

    The Isle of Jura Distillery is one with a mission. It was started with the intention of providing employment to the locals and also to produce a Highland whisky that was not as peaty as the rest – but distinctive. It seems to have achieved both with some success. Jura is a magical remote island off the west coast of Scotland, where distilling whisky is at the core of the community.