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  • Career for Criminologist in Edinburgh?

    Hello,

    I am graduating with a Master of Science degree in Criminology (Crime Sciences) in August/September and thinking about re-locating to Scotland shortly after graduation (October/November/December).

    I already have some experience in my field (two years with juvenile delinquents/and troubled teens, 1 year volunteer work with Roma families mostly facilitating communication/translation/interpretation)

    I love working with teens so I definitely want to head into that direction, when looking for a job in Scotland (Edinburgh preferably).

    I also speak five languages fluently (due to having been a resident in a couple of countries over the past few years). German, Italian, French, Dutch and English of course. Would that help me to get a job? I am not looking for a translator/interpreter job, but maybe a job where I could put my languages to good use.


    So here my questions:
    1) Are criminologists "sought after" in Scotland (Edinburgh)?
    2) Would I be able to start working with juvenile delinquents without knowing the UK criminal justice system well? Or would I have to get started on some courses first?
    3) Are there certain jobs that are 'made for' Criminologist? I have seen that there are Youth Offending Teams, which sounds like a job 'tailored' for a Criminologist, but from what I've read you need to be a registered social worker (which I am not).

    4) What salary could I expect with a Master degree and 3 years of relevant working experience?

    Any advice is much appreciated!!

    Thanks in advance,
    Julia

  • #2
    Hi Julia and welcome to the forum.

    Where are you from - do you require a work permit to work in the UK?

    Youth Offending Teams are nothing to do with criminology - this is very much a social work role dedicated to stopping young people offending and re-offending.

    Might be worth your while having a look round the Police Scotland website. Police Scotland - Keeping People Safe

    Look forward to hearing from you.

    Comment


    • #3
      This is a resource for UK students, I've posted the section specifically aimed at UK Criminology graduates.



      What can I do with my degree in criminology? | Prospects.ac.uk

      Comment


      • #4
        The others are correct.

        Social workers spend at least three years at uni learning and developing skills such as family work, conflict resolution, crisis intervention, assessment, care planning, counselling, (plus others) as well as studying sociology, drug and alcohol issues, mental health, anti-discrimination, cultural issues, and legal framework to name but a few. Training is on-going depending on the chosen field of work after graduation. They are trained in the holistic social model as opposed to the medical model used in other sciences. Young offender prisons have social workers and psychologists in situ. Then there are specialist highly trained foster carers who provide a home for troubled teenagers as an alternative to custody. Your degree does not qualify you to work in social work. From my limited understanding criminology is a science, just as any medical degree is a science.

        You might find work as a Youth Worker but this would be an unqualified role with low pay and you might not be allowed to practice your 'profession' as it would be seen as crossing boundaries. Unfortunately, there is no shortage of youth workers. You may have more luck with the police force as some of them employ police aid workers.

        It all sounds negative for your ambition to work in the UK, but if working with young people is a definite career direction for you, you may have to consider a post graduate degree in social work or psychology.


        Good luck with whatever you decide to do.
        Last edited by lostinnz; 17th February 2015, 20:31.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by mikeyBoab View Post
          Hi Julia and welcome to the forum.

          Where are you from - do you require a work permit to work in the UK?

          Youth Offending Teams are nothing to do with criminology - this is very much a social work role dedicated to stopping young people offending and re-offending.

          Might be worth your while having a look round the Police Scotland website. Police Scotland - Keeping People Safe

          Look forward to hearing from you.
          I am from Italy, but I am studying in Belgium, so I don't really require a Visa or work permit for the UK.

          Ok, I understand that the UK seeks social workers for Youth Offending Teams. That is a legitimate choice. But just to be sure, criminologists do work with offenders and even work as consultants/specialists to prevent re-offending. This is actually something i do at the moment.
          I think that teams, that are working with offenders, should always be multidisciplinary - so you can get different insight from various disciplines.

          I might have a look into a postgraduate program in social work.

          Thank you for the information!

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Polwarth View Post
            This is a resource for UK students, I've posted the section specifically aimed at UK Criminology graduates.



            What can I do with my degree in criminology? | Prospects.ac.uk
            Thank you for the link!

            "Almost three quarters of criminology graduates are employed six months after finishing their course"

            This sounds very promising!

            I will have a look into social work and forensic psychology. I know the Open University is offering forensic psychology (Bachelor). I might be able to combine further study with work.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by lostinnz View Post
              The others are correct.

              Social workers spend at least three years at uni learning and developing skills such as family work, conflict resolution, crisis intervention, assessment, care planning, counselling, (plus others) as well as studying sociology, mental health, anti-discrimination, cultural issues and a host of other subjects. Training is on-going depending on the chosen field of work after graduation. They take a holistic approach and work closely and collaboratively with psychologists, psychiatrists, police and other agencies. Young offender prisons have social workers and psychologists in situ. Then there are specialist highly trained foster carers who provide a home for teenagers as an alternative to custody. You must have a social work degree plus social work registration to work in any Youth Offending Team. Your degree would not get you near any social work agency working directly with troubled teens. The same would apply here in NZ. A social science subject would not qualify you for registration as a social worker.

              In the professional world in the UK young people are no longer labelled as delinquents. They accept that children and young people exhibit negative behaviors for a variety of reasons such as abuse, poor parenting, environmental and social issues, and mental health problems. They take a strong holistic approach and use multi agency working to manage these issues.

              If working with young people is a definite career direction you may have to consider a post graduate degree in social work or psychology.

              Unfortunately the UK has many unemployed social workers and psychologists due to financial cut backs over the last 8 years.

              Good luck with whatever you decide to do.
              Wow! What you are describing as social worker, would be exactly what criminologists are doing here (Belgium).

              I am not really worried about unemployment. In case I can't find anything in the UK, I'll just keep my job here.
              I really like my job here, and I'll be sad leaving it, especially knowing that I might have to get started on another degree before continuing to work with young people.
              But then again, I do not want to stay in Belgium for the rest of my life. So further study might be worth it.

              Comment


              • #8
                Good to hear you are taking a professional approach to this Julie.

                But I can assure you if a degree in criminology was seen as similar to the training they do in social work, they would allow it to be used for UK registration as a social worker.

                I don't mean to sound harsh but social work and social work training can vary enormously in different countries.

                Even if you take a post graduate degree, you will still have to satisfy the registration board in the UK that you are competent enough to practice. It's the same in many counties for many professions where registration is a requirement before you can take up work.
                Last edited by lostinnz; 17th February 2015, 22:16.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by lostinnz View Post
                  Good to hear you are taking a professional approach to this Julie.

                  But I can assure you if a degree in criminology was seen as similar to the training they do in social work, they would allow it to be used for UK registration as a social worker.

                  I don't mean to sound harsh but social work and social work training can vary enormously in different countries.

                  Even if you take a post graduate degree, you will still have to satisfy the registration board in the UK that you are competent enough to practice. It's the same in many country for many professions where registration is a requirement before you can take up work.
                  From looking at vacancies for criminologists in the UK, I had already figured that it's not really a reputable profession. But I hoped that it wasn't that bad. Most jobs pay an average of 25,000 pounds a year. Is that even enough to have a decent standard of living?

                  All the job offers I find mention "MA in Criminology". But here in Belgium, it is called "MSc in Crime Sciences", so it is a Master of Science. Could that somehow help my case?

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I very much doubt it.

                    The rules of accepted quals by our Professional bodies are really strict. But, the only way forward would be to ask,

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I know it all sounds very unfair Julie but such is life.

                      In my profession I qualify for many types of work in the UK. Here in NZ I qualify for very few.

                      I see managerial jobs where I am more qualified, experienced, and better skilled. But since NZ still operates on an early 20th century medical model I cannot apply because I do not have a basic nursing qualification. Yet a nurse would not be considered suitable for the same job back in the UK

                      This sort of thing used to make me angry but I learned to accept the fact that I chose to live in a country where the rules are different and I have no choice but to respect them. When I move to Australia I will have to follow their rules and regulations for employment and jump through more hoops at considerable financial cost to prove I am competent enough to work in their country. This despite over 30yrs experience in my profession.

                      I learned long ago not to take it personally.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Msc crime science is a recognised qualification here but the Masters is a higher qualification that you would need to do to get those jobs.

                        MSc Crime Science

                        loads of universities do the MA course giyf

                        most EU countries do equivalent uni qualifications that are generally accepted throughout the region.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by lostinnz View Post
                          I know it all sounds very unfair Julie but such is life.

                          In my profession I qualify for many types of work in the UK. Here in NZ I qualify for very few.

                          I see managerial jobs where I am more qualified, experienced, and better skilled. But since NZ still operates on an early 20th century medical model I cannot apply because I do not have a basic nursing qualification. Yet a nurse would not be considered suitable for the same job back in the UK

                          This sort of thing used to make me angry but I learned to accept the fact that I chose to live in a country where the rules are different and I have no choice but to respect them. When I move to Australia I will have to follow their rules and regulations for employment and jump through more hoops at considerable financial cost to prove I am competent enough to work in their country. This despite over 30yrs experience in my profession.

                          I learned long ago not to take it personally.
                          It's comforting to know that I'm not the only one in this.

                          I'm really sad to hear that you are struggling with these issues, after do many years of professional experience!

                          I wouldn't be opposed to further study, For example forensic psychology. But i m afraid that if i m not happy in Scotland, and would decide tot move somewhere else that i'd nog be really qualified tot work in that country again..

                          So basically, it's all down to whether or not i'm staying in Scotland.

                          If I would do another degree in Scotland and later move elsewhere within the UK (but not scot) would I still be qualified? Or would a Scottish degree only qualify me to work in Scotland?

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            All UK degrees are accepted anywhere in the UK, ie England, Wales, Northern Ireland as well as Scotland, providing they are at the correct level and content.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Polwarth View Post
                              All UK degrees are accepted anywhere in the UK, ie England, Wales, Northern Ireland as well as Scotland, providing they are at the correct level and content.
                              and within most EU countries


                              see my earlier post

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