Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Hello from a Cape Bretoner!

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Hello from a Cape Bretoner!

    Hellooooo!

  • #2
    Hello from a Cape Bretoner!

    How's she goin' byes? Is Mise Aonghas, and I am a descendant of the "Wild Gaelic Speaking Savages" that were "invited" to Nova Scotia a long time ago. Looking for friends with a sense of humor and a love of history. Slainte!

    Comment


    • #3
      Hello Ira and welcome, good to have you with us.

      Quick question - I've heard there are several native Gaelic speakers in Nova Scotia - is this correct?

      Comment


      • #4
        "Several native Gaelic speakers"? We have a Gaelic College in St Anne's Cape Breton as well as many communities that you can hear Gaelic spoken as much as English. I remember in remote area of Loch Lomond, Cape Breton, my grandmothers cousins that could not speak English!

        Comment


        • #5
          I've read about, and enjoyed footage of, the Celtic Colours festival in Cape Breton. Strong proof that Gaelic is alive and thriving there and has been ever since Gaels settled there.
          Nice to meet you Ira - Failte

          Comment


          • #6
            Hi there Ira! Nice to meet you!


            Come to the Dark Side, we have cookies!

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Ira Taylor View Post
              "Several native Gaelic speakers"? We have a Gaelic College in St Anne's Cape Breton as well as many communities that you can hear Gaelic spoken as much as English. I remember in remote area of Loch Lomond, Cape Breton, my grandmothers cousins that could not speak English!
              That's very interesting. Any idea how many native speakers there are in your part of the world?

              Comment


              • #8
                Not sure of an actual number but I read somewhere that Cape Breton Island has approx 10,000 Gaelic speaking people, most of whom live in the Cape Breton Highlands area of Inverness County.

                I am 37 now, but I distinctly remember my uncle singing Gaelic songs at our kitchen parties. As a kid, I had no idea what he was saying and thought he was just making it up, but he was fluent and so was his mother. However, the language was lost on my Dad.

                My grandmother, Margaret McCuish, whose family came from North Uist in the early 1800's, played piano and sange traditional Celtic music on a radio variety program here in the 40's called the 'Dishpan Parade'. Although I don't have any of here recordings, my Dad tells me that she used to rock me to sleep singing Gaelic lullabyes. I still feel her when I hear those songs today.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Hi Ira and welcome to Scotland.com !!

                  I hope that you will enjoy joining in with
                  the rest of us on the site !!

                  PS. It's Inverness-shire and not county !!

                  I have merged both of your threads
                  Last edited by Babz; 20th November 2007, 22:00. Reason: 2 threads in posted in New Members !!

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Ira Taylor View Post
                    I am 37 now, but I distinctly remember my uncle singing Gaelic songs at our kitchen parties.
                    Are you sure he wasn't just doing that drunken singing thing - "Ahana HOO! De cross on de HEW! Sherry baw!"

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Did I miss something? lol

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I can only speak for Cape Breton Island, but I do know that there are other communities in the Atlantic Provinces (mainland Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island, and New Brunswick) that offer Gaelic classes for beginners. There is a strong Scottish presence in these Provinces and it shows. For instance, New Brunswick there are Highland Games and Scottish Festivals several times of the year, as well as Pictou County, Nova Scotia, celebrates the arrival of the Hector yearly as well.

                        Many well known musicians (The Rankin Family, The Barra MacNeils, Mary Jane Lamond, The Cottars, and many others) frequently record songs in Gaelic.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Ira Taylor View Post
                          Did I miss something? lol
                          Not a lot. It's a reference to a fairly unfunny Billy Connolly skit. Like most of his stuff, it was funny 30 years ago. It's not aged well.
                          GIRFUY!

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Babz View Post
                            Hi Ira and welcome to Scotland.com !!

                            I hope that you will enjoy joining in with
                            the rest of us on the site !!

                            PS. It's Inverness-shire and not county !!

                            I have merged both of your threads
                            Babz

                            I am loving it already!

                            PS.When I said "Inverness County" I wasn't referring to "Inverness-shire, Scotland". I was referring to "Inverness County, Cape Breton Island, Nova Scotia". Like I said, Cape Breton Island has a very strong Scottish presence (and rightly so!).

                            Comment

                            Working...
                            X