Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Scottish accent(s)

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Sip toy en Chile ahora

    Comment


    • I am totally intrigued by this thread. Have always loved languages and accents. I'm an American, native to the Pacific Northwest. Never thought we had an accent in Washington, where I'm from. However, when I've traveled, have heard that we Washingtonians actually do have a mild one. Interesting. However, what's really kind of fascinating is that, even brushing shoulders with other people with different accents, is the ability to start picking up that different accent. When I was in the Army (about 20 years ago), one of my best friends and roommates was from what we in the States call the Deep South. She and I are still friends today. However, when I came home for Christmas leave, my family told me I was twanging like a guitar, and my sister told me I was the only one she knew who could speak Spanish with a southern accent.

      I do have a question, though, about Scottish accents. Have been reading that there are major differences between Scotch and Irish ones. But, are there any Scottish accents that are like Mr. Scott's from the tv-series "Star Trek"? That was my first introduction to what I know perceive as a Scottish accent and am wondering if there's any reality to that at all?
      As the stars in their vast orbits, God's timing knows neither haste nor delay.

      Comment


      • Something I was going to post previously but forgot to, is that it is difficult for me to distinguish between British accents, save for Irish and Cockney. I've spoken to people from England and South Africa, for instance, and to me, they sound a lot alike. I could tell it was a British accent, but that's about it, and have to keep asking what part of Britain they're from.
        As the stars in their vast orbits, God's timing knows neither haste nor delay.

        Comment


        • 'Scotty' from Star Trek was a Canadian 'trying' to put on a Scots accent - considering his name was Doohan, he'd havae been better to try to emulate an Irish accent, rather than ours! It grates on every Scot who hears it.... and what is even more irritating is that most Americans think it IS a Scots accent.

          Scots accents are quite distinct - but we have MANY accents, Edinburgh, Border, Fife, Dundonian, Aberdonian and Weegie (Glaswegian) to name a few.

          Comment


          • Scottie was and is a joy!

            Incidentally, the original question asked about "trilled" R's which only makes it all the harder to pin down an accent - large swathes of England's population speak with a trilled R, including the whole of the south west and also north Lancashire.

            Scots accents are also now very popular in the UK for radio and TV presentation.

            Comment


            • Originally posted by Polwarth
              'Scotty' from Star Trek was a Canadian 'trying' to put on a Scots accent - considering his name was Doohan, he'd havae been better to try to emulate an Irish accent, rather than ours! It grates on every Scot who hears it.... and what is even more irritating is that most Americans think it IS a Scots accent.

              I remember seeing an interview with Patrick Doohan and he said that originally his character had been cast as an Irishman but the producers decided that his accent sounded more Scottish than Irish hence they created Scotty.

              Comment


              • Well, it's weel seen that the people involved couldn't tell a cod-Irish from a cod-Scots accent, eh?

                Comment


                • While you're on the subject of Scots and Irish accents, I have to say I think it's quite understandable that people of other countries, be they from the US, Canada or wherever, might find the two similar and find it difficult to distinguish. A soft Highland accent is often very similar to a soft Irish one, indeed more so than it is to the harsher sounding Lowland accents, especially the east coast and cities.

                  It was also not that long ago that Highlanders also pronounced "th" as "t" or "d" (as the Irish still do) due to the Gaelic language having no "th" sound.
                  Indeed, the Irish have retained this in most of their regional accents. N.B THe word for "three" is "trì" in Scottish and Irish Gaelic.

                  Fluent Scottish Gaelic speakers still might also pronounce "th" as "t" when speaking in English,(I know one lady from Uibhist/Uist who does) but I haven't come across first-tongue English-speaking Scots who do so. Of course in Ireland the majority of the population still do.

                  Comment


                  • Originally posted by Steaphan
                    Fluent Scottish Gaelic speakers still might also pronounce "th" as "t" when speaking in English,(I know one lady from Uibhist/Uist who does) but I haven't come across first-tongue English-speaking Scots who do so. Of course in Ireland the majority of the population still do.
                    Do they really? Never noticed that. It's lesser a 't' sound than a slenderized 'r' sound to my ears.
                    Scot in exile, don't ask.

                    Comment


                    • Doohan was trying to copy some Aberdonian soldiers he had known while with the Canadian military in WWII.


                      (Two can play at George Orwell quotes)
                      "In this country I don’t think it is enough realized—I myself had no idea of it until a few years ago—that Scotland has a case against England."

                      Comment


                      • Originally posted by Fuathas
                        Originally posted by Steaphan
                        Fluent Scottish Gaelic speakers still might also pronounce "th" as "t" when speaking in English,(I know one lady from Uibhist/Uist who does) but I haven't come across first-tongue English-speaking Scots who do so. Of course in Ireland the majority of the population still do.
                        Do they really? Never noticed that. It's lesser a 't' sound than a slenderized 'r' sound to my ears.
                        Well, it's only when she pronounces the actual number "three" while speaking in English. She definitely says "tree"! From "trì" in Gaelic.

                        Comment


                        • THere's bene a lot of debate as to where Wallace atcually came from. I always thought he was form Ayrshire.

                          I don't think where you were born matters in what you call yourself. It's how you were raised to some extent, but i think it's who you are inside that defines what culture you belong to.
                          "The true will is a manefestation of the true self; know thyself through thy ways"

                          Comment


                          • R.I.P. Scottie

                            Originally posted by ANDY-J2
                            Originally posted by Polwarth
                            'Scotty' from Star Trek was a Canadian 'trying' to put on a Scots accent - considering his name was Doohan, he'd havae been better to try to emulate an Irish accent, rather than ours! It grates on every Scot who hears it.... and what is even more irritating is that most Americans think it IS a Scots accent.

                            I remember seeing an interview with Patrick Doohan and he said that originally his character had been cast as an Irishman but the producers decided that his accent sounded more Scottish than Irish hence they created Scotty.
                            I see that James Doohan kicked the bucket today, Scottie finally beamed up and all that. However I heard (forgotten from where) that the character was Scottish because of the Scots reputation as engineers.
                            There are two types of people in this world, good and bad. The good sleep better, but the bad seem to enjoy the waking hours much more.

                            Comment


                            • Re: R.I.P. Scottie

                              Originally posted by TheScottishEconomist
                              I see that James Doohan kicked the bucket today, Scottie finally beamed up and all that. However I heard (forgotten from where) that the character was Scottish because of the Scots reputation as engineers.
                              [/B]
                              From CBC:

                              James Doohan, best known for playing Montgomery "Scotty" Scott on the original Star Trek series, has died at the age of 85.

                              The Canadian actor died early Wednesday morning at his home in Redmond, Wash., said his agent and friend Steve Stevens. The cause of death was pneumonia and Alzheimer's disease.
                              Last summer, Doohan's family and representatives confirmed that the ailing actor had been diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease.

                              Doohan had been suffering from Parkinson's disease, diabetes and lung fibrosis, which he developed after chemical exposure during the Second World War, when he served as a captain in the Royal Canadian Artillery.

                              In late August, Doohan was recognized with a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame. Joined at the ceremony by three of his former Star Trek co-stars – George Takei, Nichelle Nicols and Walter Koenig – he made what was expected to be one of his last public appearances.

                              Born in Vancouver in March 1920, Doohan was raised in Sarnia, Ont. After the Second World War, where he took part in the Juno Beach invasion on D-Day, Doohan became an actor, beginning on radio dramas in 1946.

                              He later moved into TV as a character actor, including a role on the 1953 CBC series Space Command and the 1956 CBC-TV drama Flight Into Danger, author Arthur Hailey's first screenplay. The show would serve as an inspiration for Hailey's debut novel, Runaway Zero-Eight, published in 1958, and the 1970s disaster film genre.

                              Doohan's ability to master many dialects and different accents impressed Gene Roddenberry, the creator of a new space adventure, in 1966. On the strength of a strong Scottish accent, producers chose Doohan for the original cast of Star Trek, which ran from 1966 to 1969.

                              He was eventually burned into pop culture history, with iconic Star Trek phrases like "Beam me up, Scotty." Doohan later reprised his role as the scrappy space engineer Scotty in seven Star Trek movies and a number of video game adapations.

                              Comment


                              • Originally posted by Ged
                                THere's bene a lot of debate as to where Wallace atcually came from. I always thought he was form Ayrshire.

                                I don't think where you were born matters in what you call yourself. It's how you were raised to some extent, but i think it's who you are inside that defines what culture you belong to.
                                Have you been hanging around with yok_finney?

                                Comment

                                Working...
                                X