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Rolling your R's

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  • temp
    replied
    Rolling the R's

    Hi ArizonaDon
    Well I started learning spanish 5 years ago and I really had a hard time with rolling my R's, and yet I could do it when I was a little kid (about 3 or 4 yo).
    And last year, for no particular reason, I realized I could do it. Actually at this time, I listened to opera singers all day long. My first word was: Mario.
    I'm not sure that will help but what I want to say is, don't worry, that might happen without even you noticing.
    Good luck,
    Mignonne.



    [Edited by Mignonne on 27th January 2002 at 11:49]

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  • temp
    replied
    Reply to Arazona Don

    Are you wanting to cop a Scottish accent 24/7 as if it were your own? Like they said, a prat.Learn Bra Scots and save it for Robert Burns poetry readings. To get a good sample go on Microsoft Encarta and search for the sound file of To a mouse. Go call your local university and ask about actor's accent traing tapes they can tell you where to buy them. But, Don I wouldn't be so honest about your fasination with Scotland. I'm not trying to be ugly at all, but you open yourself up to people laughing at your posts.

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  • temp
    replied
    Re: That is one big strike against the English, they killed the native tongue

    Originally posted by PRgirl
    How many young people still speak a native form of Scottish Gaellic or is it moribund as we speak? It is sad when people lose their traditions. North Americans will always put some "imitation" accent, rather than be accurate and thorough and get it right with a true member of that society.
    For 2000-01, there were 34 Gaidhlig medium nurseries with 413 kids; 1862 pupils in Gaidhlig medium primary schools; 909 pupils in fluent Gaidhlig classes in High Schools and 2310 kids in Gaidhlig Learners classes in high schools. This is quite a change from 2 units and 30 pupils in 1985. I would say the language is far from dead and the numbers of Gaidhlig learners is really encouraging. We are waiting on preliminary data from this year's census to see the results of those questions.

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  • temp
    replied
    Jim,
    thank you for the detailed instructions. I appreciate the time you took to describe the process.
    Thanks to you other fine Scots for helping me with the 'rolling r'.

    PRGirl. To hear some great Scottish music Alex Beatons web site is http://www.alexbeaton.com. It's a shame that he has to come here to make a living singing he beautiful songs of the Scots and the Irish. I've been to many of his concerts here in Arizona. By the way, Alex is not a PRAT. He was born and raised in Scotland and tells of Scot history in his concert. I have recorded a few Scot songs (Bonnie Dundee, Seven Drunken Nights, and soon These Are My Mountains), But I don't have his voice, and you purists will cringe at very poor Scot accent . Besides the cds, I have them available (free) on my music website http://www.dontibbits.com/music.html . Mine are totally created in my home, where Alex is a pro and does his recording in a studio. If your interested, I can give you the names of the cds of his that I think are the best.

    I realize that i am naive about the Scottish language and am sorry that my quest is sad for those among you who believe that the Scottish language that you grew up with is being basterdized. But the Scottish I hear may be wrong, but it is beautiful to my ears.

    I have just discovered that my wife is a direct descendant of many Scottish Kings and Queens (and English Kings and Queens). I'm still trying to make a connection with my great-grandmother Georgia Scott.

    Thanks to all of you for all the emails
    Don Tibbits
    [email protected]

    Library of Photography http://www.libraryofphotography.com/
    Library of Links http://www.libraryoflinks.com/
    Library of Arizona http://www.libraryofarizona.com/
    Library of Macintosh http://www.dastcom.com/lom/lom.html

    Don Tibbits Photography http://www.dontibbits.com/
    Don Tibbits Music http://www.dontibbits.com/music.html

    Dastcom Graphics http://www.dastcom.com/
    Dastcom Mall http://www.dastcommall.com/
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  • temp
    replied
    how to roll an r

    It's not that easy, until you can do it.

    Some people claim they cannot do it, along
    the lines of rolling up their tounge to
    make a pipe-like shape. This is wrong,
    and anyone normal can roll their r.

    It's a dynamic vibration of the tip of the
    tongue against the ridge behind the upper
    teeth, caused by air flow over a loose
    and correctly positioned tongue.

    Don't try and move your tongue tip. The air
    flow does it for you. To start with, use
    plenty of air.

    Most people can make a trill with their lips already
    (brrr it's cold...? or a horse noise?)
    and most people can make a raspberry with
    the tongue sticking out (it's usually the lower
    lip that vibrates, but you can do upper, or both)
    and if you can, do these, and feel how you use
    air and the position of the lax lips to
    create the trilling.

    Now you need to try to create the same feeling
    in the tip of the tongue.

    Once you've trilled your tongue tip, time to learn
    to trill your uvula!

    Jim

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  • temp
    replied
    Hello The_Bruce person, what's your opinion on this European Union all one Currency

    Bruce, what's your feeling about all this European Union, one currency, let's all be one people idea? Is it good, is it bad? I do not have an opinion I am not European. What's yours? Curious, PRgirl.

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  • temp
    replied
    That is one big strike against the English, they killed the native tongue

    How many young people still speak a native form of Scottish Gaellic or is it moribund as we speak? It is sad when people lose their traditions. North Americans will always put some "imitation" accent, rather than be accurate and thorough and get it right with a true member of that society.

    By the way, I know absolutely nothing about Scottish music. I couldn't name you a single recording artist, past or present of Scottish origin. It goes to show you how sometimes we are all encapsulated in our own societies. If it sounds anything as pretty as Irish music, I would love to hear it.

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  • temp
    replied
    Originally posted by ArizonaDon
    . . Of course, I could watch 'Braveheart' over and over again and try to mimic the actors speech. Whether or not the verbiage was said in proper Scot I do not know, but it sounded right to an American boy who grew up in upstate New York
    I'm afraid it wasnt. It would have helped if they had actually cast Scots in the main role(s).

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  • temp
    replied
    Dancer and Lin..thank you for your suggestions. I really appreciate a little direction. Of course, I could watch 'Braveheart' over and over again and try to mimic the actors speech. Whether or not the verbiage was said in proper Scot I do not know, but it sounded right to an American boy who grew up in upstate New York...and has just found out that my great-grandmother was a Scott (Georgia Scott). I just love the Scots and their interpretation of the English language.

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  • temp
    replied
    Hiya Dan, I,m a total newbie to this forum and 100% Scots. I,ve been pondering for ten minutes...... exactly how does one instruct another to roll his/her R,s?????? Lin,s reply is probably spot on...

    But - I remember my brothers when they were wee - rolling their Matchbox cars across the floor, saying "vvrrrrooom.... vrrrroooom".... ultimate example of rolling cars and R,s at the same time..... Now if this makes any sense, it,s the nearest solution I can come up with. <grin>

    Good luck bonnie laddie.

    Christine

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    cool
    where in holland
    i would love 2 learn dutch
    can u let me know more info
    willie

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  • temp
    replied
    Whahaha! Fun thread this is...
    Wow... 'rolling an R'... Maybe this will help. First let me tell you I am dutch and we dutchies seem to be know as language experts... (could start an other discussion about that!)

    A few years ago I travelled through South Africa with Scottish and English people. We also had one dutch guy in our group called Jeroen... He introduced himself as Jerome because his orig. name should be to difficult to pronounce. Aha! We didn't want to let the group get away with that one so we decided it should be our mission to let the group pronounce his name correctly... Mission failed though... the R in his name you know.... Well, what we did found out was that the pron. of the R in english is soft and dull (in our ears then). To let an R roll, you really have to losen up your tounge and place the tip of your tounge in the front of your mouth, behind the tooth... Also; flatten your tongue!
    Practice with 'row'... Don't let any air slip through and let it just do all the work...

    Good luck and keep listening to those great Scottish singers! ;-)

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Imitation is the sincerest form of flattery, but a fake Scots accent (e.g. Scotty from Star Trek, or Richard Attenborough's character in Jurassic Park) can really make one cringe.

    I don't think anyone has a problem with you wanting to get an authentic sound, Arizona, it's just that getting it wrong can come across as parody. If you're serious, find a voice coach. Otherwise, I'd advise you to sing in your own voice.

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  • temp
    replied
    As you can see, we have an entire forum dedicated to the Scots language(s)here at Scotland.com. Have you read any of it?
    My earlier comments to you were not meant to discourage you from increasing your knowledge about our language, but merely to dissuade you from a dubious attempt a mimicry (how do you "roll an r"?).

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  • temp
    replied
    Whoops.
    I must be naive about this discussion board. The Scot dialect I hear, and love to hear, is a variation of English..but with the beautiful Scottish ring. This must be different than Gaelic (which I'm sure also is melodic) that this board is about. Sorry.
    By the way, this colonist doesn't know what a prat is..but, it doesn't sound like something I want to be. I've met Alex a number of times and if he's a prat, he's a very nice prat...and he has a wonderful voice and is a master on the guitar...does great work on songs like 'Bonnie Dundee' (which I have also recorded) and many others.
    Any suggestions/web sites about the Scot language I'm interested in would be greatly appreciated. Thanks for letting me know I'm barking up the wrong board...and warning me that my lack of knowledge about this subject would lead to me being looked on as being a prat. Thaht suends bloody bahd...achhh!

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