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Gaelic- Does it still exist?

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  • Gaelic- Does it still exist?

    I never knew much about discrimination. I understand why people fear the unknown, but I don't understand why people fear difference. As I've been told again and again, if we were all the same, wouldn't the world be SO boring?
    I questioned a friend of mine about Gaelic. She didn't give me a sufficient answer. I do believe she has some Scottish blood, but I never asked. She told me not many people in Scotland actually speak Gaelic anymore.
    Out of all I know, Gaelic is the only language I've heard of before for Scotland. True, I don't know much about the world. And I have no doubt a lot of people here know how to speak Gaelic. What's the difference between Gaelic and the other Scottish languages? What is the language closest to Gaelic?

    *~Wendy~*

    [Edited by PriNCeSs_2006 on 16th December 2000 at 04:01]
    Peace out,
    *~The Princess of 2006~*
    *~Wendy~*

  • #2
    About 1% of the population speak Gaelic, mostly in the far North. Nearly all of them are bilingual, as the other 99% speak English. Blairgowrie is famous for having street names in Gaelic as well as English as far South as it is. The closest language to Gaelic is Irish Gaelic, or just Irish. In Waverley Station, Edinburgh there is a welcome sign saying "Failte gu steisean Dhun Eideann" (I couldn't put the right accents on) which means "Welcome to Edinburgh Station". I tried to learn Gaelic once but didn't get very far for lack of time, but it's a cool language. Lots of English stuph comes from Gaelic (well, some anyway).
    Tim Macdonald.
    An sgiamh a'ghealach air an tuinn ghlasa.
    _________________________________
    For thy sweet love remembered such wealth brings
    That then I scorn to change my state with kings.
    _________________________________
    Heureux l'étudiant qui comme la rivière arrive à suivre son cours sans sortir de son lit.

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    • #3
      Yeah, I've been told that not many people speak Gaelic. I just hope I can be able to learn some if I ever go to Scotland. I think, if I finish my projects and homework, I could study Gaelic. I guess I'm just to lazy, though. I think I'll stick to reading fiction books that take place in Scotland... or England
      Peace out,
      *~The Princess of 2006~*
      *~Wendy~*

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      • #4
        I've heard the "Inspector Rebus" books are good. I've not read any, but they're set in the Edinburgh that I know and love.
        CYA L8R
        An sgiamh a'ghealach air an tuinn ghlasa.
        _________________________________
        For thy sweet love remembered such wealth brings
        That then I scorn to change my state with kings.
        _________________________________
        Heureux l'étudiant qui comme la rivière arrive à suivre son cours sans sortir de son lit.

        Comment


        • #5
          dia dhuit agus conas ata tu? ofcourse gaelic still exists weather it is Scotish gaelic or just Irish and it is thought in schools all over Ireland still until you finish school and go into college. Most Irish school kids don't like learning it but it is a great and unique language!!!

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          • #6
            SLAINTE;
            Of course Gaelic exist, it's not spoken as written ,there fore somewhat hard to learn, and i'm having a time of it with the book and tapes that I have. But with my heritage at stake I'll stick it out and learn all i can.
            ALBA GU BRATH.
            FROM Skywalker.
            TAIN GEIL
            JOHN L. MOORE.SR.
            Clan MUIR
            MY Heart is in Ayrshire

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            • #7
              Gaelic still exists
              out in estern parts of Canada it is still spoken and there are also radio stations that are all Gaelic and news papers..there are classes out there as well. not only in scotland or Ireland, so you see the Gaelic language is still very much alive and Kicking.
              I am studying gaelic myself I dont really find it harder than the others-like learning any new language it does take time.

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              • #8
                Celtic languages...

                Well, perhaps some general info about celtic languages.

                There are two major kinds of celtic languages. The "P-celtic" and the "C-celtic".
                The C-celtic is represented by the Gàidhlig (Scots Gaelic), the Gaeilge (Irish Gaelic) and
                the Manx Gaelic (spoken on the Isle of Man).
                The P-celtic is represented by i.e. the Welsh (Wales), the Cornish (Cornwall) and the Brythonic
                (Brittany).

                The names (P/C) stem from the consonant changes the P-languages were undergoing during course of time. Many c-sounds changed into p- or f-sounds.

                ...slan agus beannachd,

                Rüdiger
                --
                Rüdiger Reinhardt -- [email protected]

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                • #9
                  Gaelic lives!

                  Go to the Northwest, the Isle of Skye, the other Isles...
                  it's not only spoken by grandparents.
                  It's a beautiful language, it's not forgotten and there is more than just one scottish lad or lass who wants to learn the traditional language...it's not really about nationalism, but about culture...
                  wouldn't you like to know the way your ancestors lived?
                  Isn't it a shame to forget where you come from?
                  For example, in my family there is some french blood and isn't it normal that I want to learn french cos it's the native tongue of my grandma's family?

                  Or take Runrig, with their songs in Gaelic.

                  Or the traffic signals and names in the Northwest Highlands...big big letters in Gaelic, and very small ones in English.


                  Slàinte

                  -Mhairi-
                  Live and let live...accept and be accepted.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    The Inspector Rebus Series

                    While I'm no expert on Ian Rankin, the author of the series of books about Inspector John Rebus, they are not what I would recommend for someone wanting to immerse themselves in Gaidhlig culture. Rankin was born in Fife, lives in Edinburgh, and has his hero, Rebus, located in Edinburgh, too. I'm early on in the series, beginning book #3, but so far I think I've only encountered a few Scots words - some quite colorful words at that, but no Gaidhlig. And it may not be books you want potential tourists to read. Sometimes late at night when reading Rankin's books about parts of Edinburgh that are definitely off the tourist track, I question whether I really want to walk around there all by myself! While you may want to keep these away from the tourists, Ian Rankin's books are as good as mystery novels get!
                    If you are interested in a Highland setting, Diana Gabaldon's time-travel books are hugely popular. Start with "Outlander" and then proceed book by book through the series. By then, you will be fighting mad and demanding independence for Scotland. M.C. Beaton's series dealing with Hamish Macbeth is very light, quick reading. D.K. Broster's "The Jacobite Trilogy", three interlinked novels, set in and around the '45, has been recommended to me.
                    If someone wants to breathe in the spirit of Scotland, instead of reading fiction, however well-written, I would recommend the poetry of Hugh MacDiarmid, especially "The Hugh MacDiarmid Anthology". Although he wrote in Scots, as well as English, MacDiarmid, (a.k.a. Christopher Murray Grieve), spent years of his adult life living and writing in the Highlands and has been called "one of the great poets of the world...he has succeeded in his aim to nourish 'the little white rose of Scotland'". His work is, quite simply, remarkable. If the thought of reading a book of poetry intimidates you, begin with "Scotland Small?", a little poem that can take your breath away.


                    [Edited by DCubed on 30th December 2001 at 19:01]
                    Luceo non Uro -- I shine not burn

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                    • #11
                      I don't know the Rebus books, but I'm reading Diana Gabaldon's time-travel books.
                      I'm now nearly finished with the 3rd book, and I can really recommend them...very good, (ok depends on yer personal interests), very realistic, even the "mystic" parts, and absolutely correct in history...

                      Can also be read by lads! (as I've heard from friends)

                      By the way, in another discussion someone tried to explain the nonsense of Gaelic as the native tongue by mentioning William Wallace who spoke Scots...
                      That's rubbish. Nobody knows which language a farmer's family spoke 700 years ago...but Gàidhlig is only dying out cos of Culloden...
                      cos everybody who dared to speak Gàidhlig in public had to fear for his health or live.
                      (that's not from Diana Gabaldon but from my history books anyway, she has mentioned it in an absolutely correct way)

                      Slan. Mhairi
                      Live and let live...accept and be accepted.

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                      • #12
                        Gaelic words

                        Can somebody pls give me the gaelic words for the following:

                        "Together forever"

                        and

                        "For eternity"

                        You'll have to email me, cause I don't know if I can find my way back here.

                        Thanks

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                        • #13
                          I don't know the words, but if you want somebody to send an email, it could be a help to give your address...
                          By the way, to find your way back, if somebody replies you get an email-notification with a link, so you'll have no problem to find your way back
                          Live and let live...accept and be accepted.

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                          • #14
                            Mhairi,
                            William Wallace belonged to a social class that nowadays we would probably term gentry.Almost certainly his first language would have been French like the rest of the Scottish social elite however he would also have spoken Scots and in all probability Gaelic.

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                            • #15
                              Context?
                              Live and let live...accept and be accepted.

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