Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Learning Scottish Gaelic

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Learning Scottish Gaelic

    Recently, I've been considering learning Scottish gaelic, due to my Scottish ancestory (I'm half Scottish, half Japanese). I have a few questions about Scottish gaelic:

    I've been told that to ever become truly fluent in Scottish gaelic it is neccesary to start at an early age or be born into it, is this true? Also, I'm 14, is this too late to ever become fluent?

    How many irregular verbs is there?

    Aside from the myths, what is the actual toughness of the language?

    Can anyone suggest a decent course?

    Also, is there still a significant population that use Scottish Gaelic on a day-to-day basis as their first language?

    Are all dialects of Scottish Gaelic mutually intelligable?

    Also, I hear that Scottish Gaelic speakers don't like people other than Scottish or white people using Gaelic, I have somewhat Asian features, and apprently as a lot of the Gaelic speakers are of older generations, it is possible they'd take offence from a conservative mindset, is that true?

    Thanks,
    COF

  • #2
    I am not a Gaelic speaker. I cannot believe that any Gaelic speaker would be racist about who learns the language...

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by COF
      Also, I hear that Scottish Gaelic speakers don't like people other than Scottish or white people using Gaelic, I have somewhat Asian features, and apprently as a lot of the Gaelic speakers are of older generations, it is possible they'd take offence from a conservative mindset, is that true?
      This is not true at all. There is a fair amount of rubbish written about Gaelic and it's people who know nothing about the language and culture that are responsible.

      The best place to start learning Gaidhlig (Scottish Gaelic) is the Save Gaelic website forums

      http://savegaelic.org/forum/

      You will find people from all over the world learning, it's the best starting point.



      Slainte Mhath
      MacCoinneach

      An rud A bhios na do bhròin, cha bhi e na do thiomhnadh.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by COF
        I've been told that to ever become truly fluent in Scottish gaelic it is neccesary to start at an early age or be born into it, is this true? Also, I'm 14, is this too late to ever become fluent?
        Its a challenge to become truly fluent in any language if youre not taught very early on but its possible with a bit of effort. I know several people who learnt the language as adults and are more fluent/literate than many who are native speakers.
        Aside from the myths, what is the actual toughness of the language?
        It is supposed to be fairly tough for English speakers - tougher than a germanic or romance language would be to learn for example - but it can be done.
        Can anyone suggest a decent course?
        This is the link to the group in charge of helping people learn the language and anything you need should be available there.
        Also, is there still a significant population that use Scottish Gaelic on a day-to-day basis as their first language?
        Very hard to say. The majority of people in the outer hebridies and in parts of the inner hebridies speak it as their first language and many will use it day to day.
        Are all dialects of Scottish Gaelic mutually intelligable?
        Yes as all the surviving dialects form a regional continuum. If the dialects of the North Sea gaels/East Highlands etc had survived it might be a lot tougher understanding some people.
        Also, I hear that Scottish Gaelic speakers don't like people other than Scottish or white people using Gaelic, I have somewhat Asian features, and apprently as a lot of the Gaelic speakers are of older generations, it is possible they'd take offence from a conservative mindset, is that true?
        Its certainly true that most of the remaining 'gaelic' areas are very conservative but i wouldnt say theyre overtly racist. In all honesty the spectre of any non Scot/ Non-Caucasian using the language is probably so rare as to be almost unimaginable to most although there was a significant Asian population in the Isles until recent times who had (through necessity relating to work) learnt the language and spoke it to the natives. I think the best thing is not to worry about such a negative prospect.

        Comment

        Working...
        X