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Best Books on Scots and Old and Current Scots slang

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  • Best Books on Scots and Old and Current Scots slang

    Hello. Besides The Oxford English Dictionary second edition
    Macleod's Scots Thesaurus
    Slang and Its Analogues

    What are the best dictionaries and thesaurues on Scots, and old and current Scottish slang?

  • #2
    I think it's the word 'slang' that is bothering me (as i have read some of your other posts)...
    Are you just looking for words in normal Scots usage, which might be different to American words?

    As i mentioned before (on another thread)... Irvine Welsh & Laura Hird both write books in broad, 'urban' Edinburgh dialect.
    Might be useful to you.

    But i wouldnt necessarily call it 'slang'... perhaps thats the bit that is confusing us?
    'all our plans were made on streets the winter paved, as streetlamp lucozade orange fell...'

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    • #3
      Gie it up, Lithgae. That's wan Murcan you urnae gonnae ejimakate... as much as you try!

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      • #4
        I'm REALLY trying to understand!
        'all our plans were made on streets the winter paved, as streetlamp lucozade orange fell...'

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        • #5
          And you and he are supposed to be the 'same' (AZZIF!!!!)

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          • #6
            Ken what i mean, im trying to see his POV, but... it's so... difficult!
            I think im ready to give up my New Years Resolution to be 'nicer' before i've even started!!
            'all our plans were made on streets the winter paved, as streetlamp lucozade orange fell...'

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            • #7
              Gie it up, hen..... gie it up!

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              • #8
                Is "ejimakate" a Scots coloquialism or is it a worldwide euphemism? My Dad used to use that expression frequently. Just wondered if it was handed down or if I just happened to fall under its universal application?
                Roger
                Alba a' Calma

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                • #9
                  Huvnae a clue!

                  Lithgae was born in the USA.... met and married a Scot - and has lived here for a very long time...

                  Ejimakate may well be a universal word. All I know is that the OP here suffers from an inability to recognise slang, old English, Lallans, Scots or Doric and out-of-date colloquialisms.

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                  • #10
                    Ejimikate is just a nonsense word. It's a nonsense pronunciation of the word educate that might be used in informal everyday speech just like cockney rhyming slang but it isn't a colloquialism.
                    "Our scientific power has outrun our spiritual power. We have guided missiles and misguided men."

                    - Martin Luther King Jr.

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                    • #11
                      Thank you for ejimikating me. Every day when I came home from school my dad used to ask me, "Didja git yerself sum edjimikation tahdaee?"

                      By the way, Lithgae, where did you grow up in the USA?
                      Roger
                      Alba a' Calma

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                      • #12
                        I grew up in California... Have been in Scotland 20 years, apart from 4 years of HELL down in London.
                        I'm a naturalised British citizen now, and wont ever return to the US to live. This is definitely 'home'.
                        'all our plans were made on streets the winter paved, as streetlamp lucozade orange fell...'

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                        • #13
                          Casssell's Slang Dictionary lists some Scottish slang terms.

                          Perhaps this might an easier question to answer:

                          Can someone please tell me what are the best dictionaries on slang in the English language and on UK slang?

                          There's Highland Scots, Lowland Scots, Ullans and Lallan Scots, and Shelta. What other variations of Scots are there?

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                          • #14
                            Give UP. You just don't (or won't) accept that what you are asking is beyond the ken of a foreigner. Ullans is NOT a Scottish language, it is the language of the Ulster Irish (who may or may not have Scottish ancestry).

                            If you can't even comprehend THAT, you are never going to be successful in 'writing' your cartoon. I suggest you give up the idea of basing it in Scotland and using Scottish expressions - base it on what you KNOW rather than a garbled sense of what you THINK might be acceptable Scottish characterisations and slang.

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                            • #15
                              Polsworth, I am not basing my cartoon in Scotland or the UK, but some of the stories would take place there and around the world.

                              I don't want to offend or patronize anyone.

                              When I joined these forums, I gave people the wrong impression about myself.
                              I have a 170-something IQ, but I don't know everything.
                              Art, math and mathematics are areas I'm very knowledegeable, in but cultures in other countries is not my forte.
                              Polsworth, if I have offended you in any way, I apologize.

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