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Need Scots translations please and term questions

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  • Need Scots translations please and term questions

    Hello. I need Scots translations for
    rock and stone besides stane, rouk, and roik.

    I need Old Scots slang translations for kittie and kittock.

    What is the Scottish slang equivalent of a Bowery Boy/'Arriet?

    Is sappyhead, or sappiehead a Scottish term?

  • #2
    I'm starting to think you're a sappyhead.

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    • #3
      That other site where he posts is SCARY - he doesn't acknowledge the answers they have given him to any of the questions (same as here, by the way!) he has typed.

      Dunderheid, might be more appropriate - and something he can use in his comic.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Polwarth
        Dunderheid, might be more appropriate - and something he can use in his comic.
        or winding up merchant.
        Scot in exile, don't ask.

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        • #5
          Mebees!

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          • #6
            Sherbrooke, sappyhead is a Scottish term?

            In Ireland, a Dublin Jackeen is the Irish version of an 'Arriet, or a Bowery Boy.
            What is the Scottish equivalent of a Bowery Boy?

            Are the terms ramp, stag, and hoity-toity used as Scottish terms, or terms uesd in Scotland?

            Are Roaring Meg, Roaring Boy and Roaring Blade Scottish terms, or terms used in Scotland?

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            • #7
              Here's a Scottish expression for you


              'Ur you DEEF?'

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              • #8
                Is Grose a Scottish writer?

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                • #9
                  Polworth, can I assume the terms I listed are used in Scotland?

                  Historically, I find that hard to believe that there aren't ant terms for Scottish roughs that were used in the 17th, 18th, 19th and early 20th centuries.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Mavericker
                    Sherbrooke, sappyhead is a Scottish term?

                    In Ireland, a Dublin Jackeen is the Irish version of an 'Arriet, or a Bowery Boy.
                    What is the Scottish equivalent of a Bowery Boy?

                    Are the terms ramp, stag, and hoity-toity used as Scottish terms, or terms uesd in Scotland?

                    Are Roaring Meg, Roaring Boy and Roaring Blade Scottish terms, or terms used in Scotland?
                    The first time I ever saw the word sappyhead was when you wrote it. I have no idea what a Bowery Boy is, so I can't help you with a Scottish equivalent.

                    A ramp is something you drive up, a stag is a male red deer, and hoity-toity is, as far as I know, not a Scottish term, although it, like many other terms, may be used there.

                    I also have no idea what the various roaring things mean

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                    • #11
                      Sappy-headed is an old Scots term meaning stupid but it isn't a slang term in common usage and the same is true of ramp which has a few meanings including to use violent language and to trample. Most Scots would never have heard of these terms however and I had to look up my Scots dictionary to confirm that sappy-headed was a real phrase. Mavericker seems to be confusing modern Scottish slang with archaic Scots terms that no one uses these days. Regrettably most Scots don't have anything more than a vague knowledge of the Scots language so while many of his words and phrases are (probably) genuinely archaic Scots they are seldom used in everyday speech nowadays.
                      "Our scientific power has outrun our spiritual power. We have guided missiles and misguided men."

                      - Martin Luther King Jr.

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                      • #12
                        In the 19th and early twentieth century, there was a street gang called the Glasgow Keelies.

                        I know keelie is an old term but is it a term that's currently in use?

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by SherbrookeJacobite
                          The first time I ever saw the word sappyhead was when you wrote it. I have no idea what a Bowery Boy is, so I can't help you with a Scottish equivalent.

                          A ramp is something you drive up, a stag is a male red deer, and hoity-toity is, as far as I know, not a Scottish term, although it, like many other terms, may be used there.

                          I also have no idea what the various roaring things mean
                          SherbrookeJacobite, what is the (old) Scottish slang equivalant of an 'Arriet?

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                          • #14
                            Keelies is still in use.

                            I would point out that SJ is a Canadian - who has visited Scotland - but would hardly be aware of Scottish slang in use today.

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                            • #15
                              An 'Arry, in the 19c-Early 20c, was the popular embodiment of the vulgar, rollicking, yet on the whole good natured rough of the great (British) metropolis. What is his Old Scottish slang counterpart?
                              Last edited by Mavericker; 30 December 2005, 01:04.

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