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Scots Gaelic translation please!

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  • Scots Gaelic translation please!

    OOps! I think I closed my thread before any one answered me.
    So I'm posting again: Please can anyone provide me with the correct spelling of the Scots Gaelic translation for = Black Dog
    Thank you.

  • #2
    AH, mystery solved. I did wonder why that poor litle thread was closed.

    Now, since a dog is cu (with a grave accent over the "u") and "black" is dubh, I *think* it should be "cu dubh"

    BUT I don't speak Gaelic and only remember odd little bits so you should wait for a second opinion, really.

    And welcome (fàilte) to Scotland.com.

    Comment


    • #3
      "cù dubh" looks good too me.

      Originally posted by Celyn
      BUT I don't speak Gaelic and only remember odd little bits so you should wait for a second opinion, really.
      Knowing a little bit is far better than not knowing any, well thats what I think.

      slainte mhath

      Alan
      MacCoinneach

      An rud A bhios na do bhròin, cha bhi e na do thiomhnadh.

      Comment


      • #4
        And welcome to you also!

        It's cold enough here in Glasgow - what's it like in the Highlands?

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Celyn
          It's cold enough here in Glasgow - what's it like in the Highlands?
          The snow is melting away fine. No sunglasses required today, it's dull but mild.

          Alan
          MacCoinneach

          An rud A bhios na do bhròin, cha bhi e na do thiomhnadh.

          Comment


          • #6
            Cù Dubh it is!

            Comment


            • #7
              Thank you!!!

              Thank you that is how I had guessed at it.
              But it is tremendous to have your help and wisdom
              Thank you truely!

              Comment


              • #8
                Cu is certainly Gaelic for hound.

                Bluebird7 I know you asked for a Scots Gaelic translation. I would just add that in Irish we make a difference between hound and dog.

                Hound is Cu as in "Cu Chualan" but we use "madra" for dog.
                In Irish "Madra-rua" means fox -the red dog.

                Just thought I would add that.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by ConorC
                  Cu is certainly Gaelic for hound.

                  Bluebird7 I know you asked for a Scots Gaelic translation. I would just add that in Irish we make a difference between hound and dog.

                  Hound is Cu as in "Cu Chualan" but we use "madra" for dog.
                  In Irish "Madra-rua" means fox -the red dog.

                  Just thought I would add that.

                  Oh, haha, yes indeed Irish does it differently. Several years ago, when I had found some basic (Scottish ) Gaelic evening classes to attend, at one point we had a sort of cheese and wine and general social jollity meeting, and this involved, for those who wished, a one-off just for the fun of it, “Irish Gaelic for Dummies” class.

                  Yes, now that I see the word again ”madra” does seem sort of familiar, but the fun bit was that this particular teacher advised us that “cù” did not mean “dog” exactly but was more likely to mean “wolf”.

                  Now, one has read of Setanta becoming the hound of Culain, but not the wolf, so I don't know whether this lady was wrong or whether it was a matter of a localised usage.

                  But it *did* stick in my mind because of the amusing but worrying thought – what if I were to go to Ireland and then, in trying to be polite/daft smartarse (delete where applicable), go happily along to shop, ask for the usual sort of bread, milk, cheese, eggs, bacon, bananas, blah blah blah stuff, and then remember to ask “oh yes, and I need a tin of wolffood and some wolfbiscuits please?” ..........”

                  I'd fear that I'd have to feel stupid (OK, I can handle *that*, being used to it ), or be thrown out of shop and/ or then having to have a little chat with the police there. Oops! ...... “No, officer, really, I do not have a dangerous wolf ........ no honestly, I don't, of course not, and no, but no, why should I go along with you in your car, for I am the most sensible Celyn, really, not as if I was in the habit of keeping a pet wolf or anything .... oh, no I really do not want to go with you in your car to the station, oh no I don't, and .......................no I do not want to wear that badly fashioned white jacket, because the sleeves are all wrong .................. ”

                  <tangent>
                  I am suddenly wondering whether Ireland has also been looking at the idea of re-introducing wolves, but I suppose that is not for the “Language” forum, and I ought to Google it.
                  </tangent>

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Celyn.

                    You know I think 'Cu' might have been interchagably in Irish in the past for hound and wolf.

                    I say this because I looked up the meaning of 'Conor' many years ago and the definition it gave was : 'Wolf-lover' or 'Lover of hounds'.

                    Having said that, in another book it said 'warriors desire'.

                    I suppose it is take your pick.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by ConorC
                      .........

                      I suppose it is take your pick.
                      But always take your shovel if you want to go to work.

                      As for wolflover, reminds me of that charming little ditty about “Bestiality's Best”

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        actually it's cù dubh, with an accent.

                        wolf: madagh allaidh.

                        all Gàidhlig, of course.
                        'S toil leam Gàidhlig a bhruidhinn agus a leughadh agus sgrìobhadh oir 'se an cànan feumail agus àlainn a th' innte.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Eleana
                          actually it's cù dubh, with an accent.

                          wolf: madagh allaidh.

                          all Gàidhlig, of course.
                          WOw thats so cool!

                          My wifes Birthday is coming up and I wanted to say to her in Scots Gaelic

                          'You are the most beautiful woman I have ever seen! Would you mind if I kissed you?'

                          If anyone could translate that for me I would be MOST grateful!!!!

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