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Native Americans have scots words

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  • Native Americans have scots words

    Many Native Americans have scots words in their conversation some told me that it was handed down from families various words.I met a Cherokee guy his name was Hensteeth Stuart Lance, he told me that many Scots married members of their tribe in 18th century especially a red haired clan called Stuarts and even today there is children born with parents who are black haired and their child has red gingery hair and they are called Busheyheads
    thats why at many Powows a joke between tribes is "To be a Cherokee get a Blonde or red head wig",,same with various Jamicans they also have scots names and use many scots words in thjeir language.

  • #2
    ever observed how many black people are with a Mc... surname in the US?
    'S toil leam Gàidhlig a bhruidhinn agus a leughadh agus sgrìobhadh oir 'se an cànan feumail agus àlainn a th' innte.

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    • #3
      There are both Native Americans and Metis here in western Canada with Scottish names. One of the Metis tribes has a Chief whose last name is Cameron. Some gaelic words have also survived among these people - a legacy of some of the early Scottish furtraders and explorers.

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      • #4
        maybe someone can shed some light on a tribe in Maine with the name Penebscott which name I find curious for an Native American tribe.
        'S toil leam Gàidhlig a bhruidhinn agus a leughadh agus sgrìobhadh oir 'se an cànan feumail agus àlainn a th' innte.

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        • #5
          Do a search for "Bungee language"


          (Two can play at George Orwell quotes)
          "In this country I don’t think it is enough realized—I myself had no idea of it until a few years ago—that Scotland has a case against England."

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Scottish_Republican
            Do a search for "Bungee language"
            Thanks SR - I live in Western Canada and didn't know about that - I did know they had kept some gaelic, but didn't realize they had incorporated it into another language. Very interesting.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Eleana
              maybe someone can shed some light on a tribe in Maine with the name Penebscott which name I find curious for an Native American tribe.
              Found this on a web site.
              How do you pronounce "Penobscot?" What does it mean? It's pronounced Puh-NOB-scott. ("NOB" rhymes with "sob.") It comes from Panawahpskek, a word in the Penobscot language that means "the place where the rocks open out." Originally the descriptive name of a Penobscot village, it came to be used for the people as well.
              http://www.native-languages.org/penobscot.htm

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Scottish_Republican
                Do a search for "Bungee language"
                I read about that - and another similiar patois - a time ago. Very interesting and a shame such a developement isnt better known.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by littlebriton
                  I read about that - and another similiar patois - a time ago. Very interesting and a shame such a developement isnt better known.
                  Aye kind of a native-Gaelic creole/pidgin. Still living on, though anglicised. The kind of language which never gets recorded that well because it's mainly spoken.


                  (Two can play at George Orwell quotes)
                  "In this country I don’t think it is enough realized—I myself had no idea of it until a few years ago—that Scotland has a case against England."

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by SherbrookeJacobite
                    Found this on a web site.
                    How do you pronounce "Penobscot?" What does it mean? It's pronounced Puh-NOB-scott. ("NOB" rhymes with "sob.") It comes from Panawahpskek, a word in the Penobscot language that means "the place where the rocks open out." Originally the descriptive name of a Penobscot village, it came to be used for the people as well.
                    http://www.native-languages.org/penobscot.htm
                    tapadh leat, a charaid! that explains it.
                    'S toil leam Gàidhlig a bhruidhinn agus a leughadh agus sgrìobhadh oir 'se an cànan feumail agus àlainn a th' innte.

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                    • #11
                      Is e do bheatha!

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                      • #12
                        bha e snog...
                        'S toil leam Gàidhlig a bhruidhinn agus a leughadh agus sgrìobhadh oir 'se an cànan feumail agus àlainn a th' innte.

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                        • #13
                          I heard lots of black slaves took the names of their masters, and as a lot of them were Scottish a lot of black people now have Scottish names. I don't know if that's true though, I can't remember where I heard it.

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