Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

translate English pronoun to Scottish

Collapse
This topic is closed.
X
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • translate English pronoun to Scottish

    translate "grandmother" or "grandma" from English to Scottish.
    I want my grandchildren to call me by the Scottish word or name for grandmother or grandma.
    Believe it or not I've tried numerous searches to translate English to Scottish and apparently there's NOTHING!!
    I would greatly appreciate your help. Thank you.
    sigpicJudy

  • #2
    Gandpa = Seanair (pronounced 'Shen-ar')
    Grandma = Seanmhair (prounounced 'Shen-a-var')

    For anything else you can try using This ; its a gaelic - english/ english - gaelic dictionary provided by the SMO website.

    Comment


    • #3
      I call my grandmother "Granny" (or Grannie) but some of my friends call theirs "Nanna". They are mostly Scottish variations of the English. I'm not sure what the actual Scots word for grandmother is.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by keltic_bhoy
        I call my grandmother "Granny" (or Grannie) but some of my friends call theirs "Nanna". They are mostly Scottish variations of the English. I'm not sure what the actual Scots word for grandmother is.
        I wouldnt call those scottish variations of english - theyre commonly used in any part of the english speaking world.

        Comment


        • #5
          Seanmhair

          So the actual Scottish word for grandma is Seanmhair, however, you simply called your grandmother "granny"?
          Would it be silly if I had my grandchild call me Seanmhair? Or would that be an inappropriate use of the word?

          By the way, thanks for responding......
          sigpicJudy

          Comment


          • #6
            There are three languages common to Scotland. The most common is English. There is 'Scots' or 'Lallans', and Gaelic - which is still spoken in parts of the Highlands and some Islands. When you asked your question, were you referring to Gaelic, or Scots?

            AnSiarach gave you the gaelic words for grandpa and grandma. I don't know what the Lallans word for grandma would be - perhaps it is the same as the English.

            I don't think it would be silly to have your grandchild call you Seanmhair - it is very much a matter of personal preference.

            Slainte

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by SherbrookeJacobite
              There are three languages common to Scotland. The most common is English. There is 'Scots' or 'Lallans.'


              On the contrary- the Scots language cannot be Lallans precisely because Lallans means Lowlands in Old English. It follows, logically, that Lallans has always been (well, ever since the Angles of Northumbria colonised the Lothians) the group of Old English dialects spoken north of the border.

              Logically, the language of the original Scots of Argyll (Gaelic) is our true Scots language.

              Try proving otherwise with conviction.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Raingeanach
                On the contrary- the Scots language cannot be Lallans precisely because Lallans means Lowlands in Old English. It follows, logically, that Lallans has always been (well, ever since the Angles of Northumbria colonised the Lothians) the group of Old English dialects spoken north of the border.

                Logically, the language of the original Scots of Argyll (Gaelic) is our true Scots language.

                Try proving otherwise with conviction.
                The nice (albeit feisty) lady asked a simple question. I gave her a simple answer.

                I didn't say that Lallans was the Scots language , what I said was there are three languages common to Scotland, or do you have difficulty reading English as well as Gaelic?

                As you yourself just said, Lallans is spoken north of the border. The last time I checked, north of the border was in Scotland.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Ignore him SJ.... as all true Scots would say about him 'his clothes button up the back'.

                  Goodness the 'True Scots' thing is braw, izzitno?

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    It is indeed!

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I'm going to use it as often as I can. I trust you will do the same?

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Only a true Scot would suggest such a thing!

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          ROFL Some things never change, right?

                          Well, Fiesty Lady, first of define what you mean with Scottish! As you can tell, there's a debate stirred up all to quick, because there is Scottish GAELIC, which has nothing to do with English
                          The SCOTS dialects lallans and doric which have little to do with current modern English but lots with OLD English
                          and then of course, the accents and dialects of the modern English, so called Scottish ENGLISH.

                          Make your choice, and I think being called seamhair makes sense if you are a descendant of Highlands/Islanders and have a deeper interest in the Gaelic language. Otherwise, keep it simple. KISS the best for kids and pets.
                          'S toil leam Gàidhlig a bhruidhinn agus a leughadh agus sgrìobhadh oir 'se an cànan feumail agus àlainn a th' innte.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Seanmhair

                            Thank you everyone for your help. I very much appreciate it.
                            [COLOR=SlateGray]So sorry to continue to be a bother, but I just want to be sure of something. My family is from Edinburgh, as far as I can tell that's not considered the lowlands,right? Wanting to be true to my family, it seems to me that Seanmhair is appropriate for me to use,yes?[/CO
                            Being from Edinburgh my family would use the Gaelic form of Scottish,yes?
                            I'm sure it's quite obvious that I'm an American, but I'm especially proud of my Scottish heritage. I know for those of you that have been born in Scotland only you are truly Scottish in the full sense of the word.
                            I've been passing on to my children their family legacy, and I want to do it accurately. Thanks so much all those who have responded.

                            Your Friend......
                            sigpicJudy

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Edinburgh is my home town and it is DEFINITELY in the Lowlands! Gaelic is not generally spoken in Edinburgh, although many are now learning it - but as a 'foreign' language. If Gaelic WAS generally spoken in Edinburgh, it was all a very, very,very long time ago!

                              I grew up calling my grandmothers 'Granny' and 'Grandma', my sister's grandchildren call her 'Nanna'.

                              So, if you want to be 'true' to your Edinburgh heritage, then the Gaelic would not appear to be 'true'... Anyways, what's wrong with 'Grandma', Granny or whatever?!

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X