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Hoe to convince the English their language is NOT better!?

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  • #16
    Eleana -
    Every region does indeed have its own accent which can lead to problems in mutual understanding for others.

    I once attended an electronics course, lasting months, in Glasgow. The instructor, albeit good at his trade, rattled off information in his Weegie lingo at faster than normal speed. Then, equally incomprehensibly, he repeated the same words, again at breakneck speed.

    Why didn`t he just speak standard English at the speed recommended by those who teach BBC announcers?

    Incidentally, how should a Gaidhlig learner pronounce the word "anns" in your tailpiece? Shouldn`t there be a standard Gaidhlig pronunciation? Frankly, some newsreaders on Radio nan Gaidheal ought to take lessons from their English counterparts.

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    • #17
      Originally posted by Raingeanach
      Eleana -
      Every region does indeed have its own accent which can lead to problems in mutual understanding for others.

      I once attended an electronics course, lasting months, in Glasgow. The instructor, albeit good at his trade, rattled off information in his Weegie lingo at faster than normal speed. Then, equally incomprehensibly, he repeated the same words, again at breakneck speed.

      Why didn`t he just speak standard English at the speed recommended by those who teach BBC announcers?

      Incidentally, how should a Gaidhlig learner pronounce the word "anns" in your tailpiece? Shouldn`t there be a standard Gaidhlig pronunciation? Frankly, some newsreaders on Radio nan Gaidheal ought to take lessons from their English counterparts.
      *looks very concerned at her tailpiece*

      You have a point here. Many Gaidhlig teachers think it will confuse the learner finding out there are accents in Gaidhlig too. Well, I go with ... geez it's hard to write up the phonetics... something like aonn...


      I think your request would be easier on people when you'd not ask for Standard English but for Standard Scottish instead, as there is such a thing.

      I concur a teacher should take his local accent back, it
      s very impolite and unprofessional to show off local accent as a teacher. Yet I would not go so far as to force BBS English on them. Just slow down a tad and leave out the colloquials.

      Could we agree on that?
      'S toil leam Gàidhlig a bhruidhinn agus a leughadh agus sgrìobhadh oir 'se an cànan feumail agus àlainn a th' innte.

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      • #18
        Hello everyone,

        I am a non-native and I learnt English at school before moving to Scotland 3 years ago. My English teachers at school and at uni were respectively from Donegal, Edinburgh and from Manchester and they had very broad accent. Also,I lived in the U.S. for a while before moving to Glasgow so you can imagine my accent is quite mixed although I sound Irish to the Scots and Glaswegian to people outwith Scotland. I believe that learning english in a particular accent doesn't constitute a problem whatsoever. The only reason why people don't understand certain accents is because they're not willing to make an effort as it only takes a while to get used to unfamiliar accents wherever they're from.

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        • #19
          I think that RP is worthless, since I do not find many people that do speak RP,
          but written English is of course good if it's written in standard English...
          Anam Ceilteach

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          • #20
            I don't speak RP, but I don't think most RP speakers would have much difficulty with most of my posts in English.


            (Two can play at George Orwell quotes)
            "In this country I don’t think it is enough realized—I myself had no idea of it until a few years ago—that Scotland has a case against England."

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            • #21
              For what it's worth, I teach English in Japan. I was never allowed to speak Scots at home due to my mother who thought it to be more "proper" to speak English. Although ma faither spoke Scots and my mother to a lesser extent had a large Scots vocab, although she thought it was English. When it comes to people understanding people, those English speakers from the British Isles tend to fiar the best, simply because the British Islands contain the largest number of English accents than any other English speaking country. Those that fair worst are North Americans. Generally many are incapable or worse not willing to understand English outside their own limited understanding of it. Which is why I have to teach such profanities like "pants" and other such nonsense. Even when in Japanese English "pantsu" means pants as in Scants or undies, Y's etc! You may also find when teaching English to foreigners that we Scots tend to pronounce phonetically. Next time you're with a non Scot get them to prnounce were or heard. Other English speakers say wur but with a soft r and huuud with a soft r. So it seems that proper English my mother taught me was wrong. It was wur and hurd not we-a-r and he-a-rd. This is difficult to get across without saying it! lol

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