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  • First and last name translation

    ok i am going to start off by saying that i already know that my last or surname does not come from either Irish or Scottish origin to my knowledge. It is English (from England) by origin i believe. anyways it is Posson the first names i am needing translated are John Jacob amd Jennifer. I have found many refferences to using Sean for John but was wandering if there was anyother translation for it other than Sean which is also French for John. I am wanting to get my wife, son and my name tattoed in an arm band that would soon become a sortof story board for my past present and future. any ways back to focus. I am needing the following translated into either irish or scottish Gealic or Celtic John Posson, Jacob Posson, Jennifer Posson, and then what would be the proper font or typeset that would have been use around the 16 or 17 century I am a fan of the old english or gothic style but want something that would be proper for that time period. also i am needing the following translated as well, "I am yours forever my beloved."

  • #2
    Well, the French for "John" is "Jean", I think, not "Sean", which is the Irish version. In Scottish Gaelic it would be Iain/Ian.

    "Jacob"? Well, isn't that the same as "James", reallly? In that case, the Scottishh Gaelic would be "Seamus".

    "Jennifer" is from Welsh, isn't it? Something along the lines of "Gwenhyffar", so it might not make sense to turn it into Gaelic; I don't know.

    A tattoo as a storyboard seems like a fun idea.

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    • #3
      John - there are several forms for this. Most usual is Iain (Ian is the anglicised form)... but there is also Eoin (Bible only), Seon, Seonaidh and Seathain (rarely seen now).

      Jacob - simply Iacob.

      Jennifer. I believe this is a Cornish name.


      (Two can play at George Orwell quotes)
      "In this country I don’t think it is enough realized—I myself had no idea of it until a few years ago—that Scotland has a case against England."

      Comment


      • #4
        Jennifer can be translated as following>:

        Gwenhwyfar
        Jenovefa
        Guenivere
        Ienafara
        Gueniver
        Gwenifre

        Choose which one you want, personally I think Gwenhwyfar is beautiest. ( It's Welsh and means Fair/White Desire)
        Anam Ceilteach

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        • #5
          Just confirming that the French for "John" is "Jean", not Sean...

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          • #6
            Originally posted by morrydwenn
            Just confirming that the French for "John" is "Jean", not Sean...
            Sean's the Irish Gaelic.
            Jean's the French.


            (Two can play at George Orwell quotes)
            "In this country I don’t think it is enough realized—I myself had no idea of it until a few years ago—that Scotland has a case against England."

            Comment


            • #7
              And just a small question - if Posson is an English name/word - why would you think there might be a Gaelic version of the name?

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              • #8
                Why not?

                After all, there's English versions of Gaidhlig names aren't there?

                Dr Johnson gets called "MacIain" for example.


                (Two can play at George Orwell quotes)
                "In this country I don’t think it is enough realized—I myself had no idea of it until a few years ago—that Scotland has a case against England."

                Comment


                • #9
                  Well yes but that's because you say Mac= someones son
                  Iain= Joh(a)n

                  Posson?
                  Should that be Pos's son?

                  Then maybe you can take this:

                  McPhňis,

                  but remember that is NOT a real gŕidhlig name since I just gaelizised the name
                  Anam Ceilteach

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                  • #10
                    translation

                    I am impressed on what i read in this site. jjj thats cool about upr tatoo. I have my childrens name on my back. Could someone please translate my childrens and my name dont know origins. Kristine, Richard Jennifer Ashley Christian my husband is mitchell thank you kristine

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Kristine= Cŕiristiona
                      Jennifer = Gwenhwyafar
                      I'll look up the other names for you!
                      Anam Ceilteach

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Eiric

                        Go raibh maith agat for spending time finding the translation. I saw your thread on clans left you a reply.
                        Im very new learning common phrases right now. My towns library or local unniversity does not offer Gaelic. please down laugh to hard, Conas ta' tu'( how are you) is this correct. Hope to chat with you later Kristine

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                        • #13
                          Well, yes, but that is Irish Gaelic...
                          In scottish Gaelic it is "Ciamar a tha thu?" Kimerr ah hah ho:
                          But anyway I do understand Irish even if I can't write it (Speak: yes a little...)
                          Anam Ceilteach

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                          • #14
                            languages

                            Its interesting the totally different styles of Gaelic, I didnt know there was that big a difference. ok well i try to find a book on scottish gaelic. Unless you want to teach me some basic phrases? I will still get the book too. I dont want to
                            monoplize ur time, but would genuinely apprectiate the help. how do you say " Hello my name is __?" "And yours is__?" Ill thread you later thanks Eiric, Cairistiona lol

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              It doesn't help that people here just call the language "Gaelic".


                              (Two can play at George Orwell quotes)
                              "In this country I don’t think it is enough realized—I myself had no idea of it until a few years ago—that Scotland has a case against England."

                              Comment

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