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Steaphan

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  • Steaphan

    I think your excellent question about the Irish Gaelic on the home page stands more chance of being acted on if it is posted in the Feedback forum. I am moving your thread for that very reason.

  • #2
    You do realize that this is about Scotland?

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    • #3
      At the time he wrote the above, Neil Caple was still a moderator of Scotlanddotcom. He certainly knows that this site is intended to be about Scotland - but many of the Americans on here have no single ancestry - many of them have Irish ancestry - which is also a Gaelic nation.

      Jings.

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      • #4
        Polwarth,

        You're being foolish! I may not know who in my family was from Scotland, but I will find out! I am not just one of these foolish American's that is not willing to learn about the hearitage. You may never know if you have any American family. For all I know we could be family. I have cousins who's mother is from Scotland and speaks with her family there.

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        • #5
          Away an bile yer heid. You seem determined to show us how little you know about Scottish and Irish heritage...

          Believe me, I KNOW who my family members are and you ain't one of them. Most of mine can spell.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Neil_Caple
            I think your excellent question about the Irish Gaelic on the home page stands more chance of being acted on if it is posted in the Feedback forum. I am moving your thread for that very reason.
            Granddaughter3

            The point Steaphan was making was that the gaelic proverb on the Scotland.com home page is written in Irish gaelic, not Scottish gaelic. The languages are similar, but different (particularly in written form). We (Scots) are cousins of the Irish, different branches on the same tree, as the author Allister MacLeod put it.

            I am completely baffled as to why you would take offense to what Polwarth had to say - he was trying to be helpful (in his first post - not the one where he was pointing out helpful hair care tips)

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            • #7
              SJ
              Yer an affae man, soyeur.

              BTW - I am female...

              Hairdressing tips aside... thank you for explaining the reasoning behind my polite comments. This woman is getting really tedious.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Polwarth
                SJ
                Yer an affae man, soyeur.

                BTW - I am female...

                Hairdressing tips aside... thank you for explaining the reasoning behind my polite comments. This woman is getting really tedious.
                Yer an affae man, soyeur

                Thanks - I think? My Scots is not very good I'm afraid. Please accept my profound apologies for referring to you as "he", I certainly should have been more careful when referring to someone who's gender I didn't know.

                I do enjoy your posts and look forward to more of them.

                I just found out that I had ancestors/relatives who lived at Kinlochleven, which is (I think) fairly close to your Stewart lands at Appin. Perhaps our ancestors knew each other.

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                • #9
                  It means 'you are an awful man, so you are'.... a compliment, believe it or not! Normally said when someone has made a clever remark.....

                  Polwarth is a small village to the south of Edinburgh, near the borders. It is also a suburb in Edinburgh - I bought my first flat in Polwarth!

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Polwarth
                    It means 'you are an awful man, so you are'.... a compliment, believe it or not! Normally said when someone has made a clever remark.....

                    Polwarth is a small village to the south of Edinburgh, near the borders. It is also a suburb in Edinburgh - I bought my first flat in Polwarth!
                    Well then thank you indeed!

                    I wondered where the name came from. I have only visited Scotland once, we landed in Glasgow and went north from there. My next trip I hope to visit Edinburgh. I have ancestors who came from there as well, James and Grizzle (lovely name!) Dechman, who emigrated to Nova Scotia in the mid 1700's.

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                    • #11
                      I've seen the name spelling as Grizel (which I assume is a local form of Griselda) - and so much nice than grizzle, which I think of as the noise tired rug-rats make...

                      Yes, Edinburgh is a 'must-do' on any trip to Scotland. The GRO is based here and the records held in the National Library on George IV Bridge makes it well worth a visit. You make already have the URL - but if not, here it is... http://www.nls.uk/

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