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  • #31
    I have no views on Ancestry.com

    All I would say is that many Americans use the LDS records and quote them as 'gospel'. They aren't! Anyone can claim anyone else as an ancestor - and then it makes it difficult to actually work out what or who are 'real'....

    I'm lucky - most of my family have been buried no more than a couple of hundred miles from my home. I really do sympathise with foreigners trying to work out their ancestry!

    Good luck with your research.

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    • #32
      The data base we've been using has a purely American heritage program and an International one to supplement that - from which Americans using it derive whatever can be obtained by access to all the records, LDS being one which is included from time to time, available to it.

      Interestingly, birth, marriage, death and probate records from various parts of Great Britain and Europe are abundantly provided, along with Peerage and Royal Families-related information and something called the "Millenium File Record."

      For certain levels, one might say, of Scottish, English, Welsh and Irish family history where the individual was or married into the aristocracy then about 25% of the time we find stories or more detailed narratives about their lives. Those, of course, are fascinating to an American for whom any tradition lasting 200 years is practically ancient, and rare by definition.

      In my personal case, I too still live in the town and region where the maternal line has lived since the early 1800s - which is a big help in that the graves are here within 100 miles or so, and several family members are still around to ask questions of.

      Looking back upon my one foray into England, with a side trip north to Leiston for the purpose of visiting A.S. Neill at his Summerhill school, my self-guided tour of Westminster Abbey pretty much cemented a requisite cultural humility most of my fellow countrymen have not experienced, evidently. So, living within close proximity to truly ancient relatives must be quite something.

      Originally posted by Polwarth View Post
      I have no views on Ancestry.com

      All I would say is that many Americans use the LDS records and quote them as 'gospel'. They aren't! Anyone can claim anyone else as an ancestor - and then it makes it difficult to actually work out what or who are 'real'....

      I'm lucky - most of my family have been buried no more than a couple of hundred miles from my home. I really do sympathise with foreigners trying to work out their ancestry!

      Good luck with your research.
      "The hands are there for friendship, the heart is there for love. For loyalty throughout the years, the crown is raised above."

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      • #33
        Scottish/English Heritage

        Greetings to all here!

        I am 56 years old, and finally persuaded the Judge to open my sealed adoption records, which was held at Miami-Dade County, Florida USA, where I was born. Spiritually I knew all along where I was from. My 37 marker yDNA and mtDNA tests also confirmed this.

        Now that I know I am a Blanton, I have traced from landing in America, certain relatives in 1654 - however, also the origin of the family:

        I found the crest, which is believed to have been granted to the Blanton Family in 1508 under the reign of King Henry VII. Originating in Lancashire County, England. It is said that their relatives were of the Clan Campbell. Sir Colin of Lochow, was knighted in 1280 and his descendant Sir Duncan was created a peer by James II of Scotland in 1445 becoming Duncan Campbell of Lochow, Lord of Argyll, Knight, 1st Lord Campbell. Colin Campbell (c. 1433–1493) succeeded his grandfather as the 2nd Lord Campbell in 1453 and was created Earl of Argyll in 1457. The 8th Earl of Argyll was created a marquess in 1641, when Charles I visited Scotland and attempted to quell the rising political crisis (and the fall-out from the event known as The Incident). With Oliver Cromwell's victory in England, the marquess became the effective ruler of Scotland. Upon the restoration, the marquess offered his services to King Charles II but was charged with treason and executed in 1661. His lands and titles were forfeited but were restored to his son in 1663, Archibald, who became the 9th Earl of Argyll.

        This is all I have researched thus far outside the U.S. I know there are "Blanton's" in the UK today, so I keep looking for cousins and descendants!

        Harry

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        • #34
          Greets to Scots

          Dear all

          Sorry if i am starting this subject not at wright place, but still if any of you is interested or just had heard any information regard Georgian and Scotish roots and similarities with these two nations please respond.
          As i have checked on DNA forum Georgians and Scots have almost same DNA and that was surprise to me. Besides i had a friend a lecturer in history locally here in Georgia, Tbilisi and he was saying, that Scots, Spanish (especially Basks) and Italians , portugese (all these are Iberians) have roots from Georgia, Caucasus.

          All these Iberians i know OK, but Scots were really surprise to me. So if anybody has any information or just interested in this issue (with similarities of two Georgian and Scot people) please answer me, here or pm.
          By the way, from archaic period there are clans in mountains of Georgia as well.

          Thanks in advance

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          • #35
            Originally posted by kakha View Post
            ..... DNA forum Georgians and Scots have almost same DNA .....
            Hi .
            Many Scots have distant Scandinavian ancestral roots , and the 13 century Icelandic historian Snorri Sturluson records that some of the Norse peoples have origins in the North Asia / Black Sea region , so the DNA linkup is not at all surprising .

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            • #36
              Using pen and paper is definitely a good way to start off your family tree quest. But so is using a computer of sorts. Maybe what is needed is some sort of compromise and it just so happens I might have one! Using some sort of word processor, create a "family template".

              In the top half of the sheet record details of the father and mother of the family group in question; include space for their parents names, marriage details and whether either (or both) remarried. Then, in the bottom half, record all the details of the children: date of birth and where born; who, when and where they married (assuming they did); and (sad, but it does happen) when they died if unmarried. (If there is census info available this too could be recorded in the bottom half!) For the children that married, a further template can be filled out, as can one for all the parents, brothers, sisters, etc of the original family group.

              Using this type of template (which of course can be adapted to suit and doesn't even have to be created on a computer) means that family details are stored in a way that is easy to follow and allows simple cross referencing (especially when used alongside a more traditional family tree type layout). Its certainly worked for me on a number of family trees that I have traced and/or helped on!

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              • #37
                I can confirm that the family template is great. Maybe its time this guide was updated to include all the suggestions and also the template itself... if you email me one Picty I'll upload it to Scot Sites!
                Support CHAS the Children's Hospice Association Scotland

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                • #38
                  The guide is some thing I have come across before, but what if you are to late in starting your family tree! Because all your relatives that could tell you about your ancestors are either dead or can not remember because they minds are gone. Then what do you do? forget the whole thing!

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