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McCracken, Wondering if name has any meaning, notoriety? Plz read

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  • McCracken, Wondering if name has any meaning, notoriety? Plz read

    Hey all, top of the morning to you! I live in Canada, and have a thick Scottish background, that i've always been curious about.. I'm wondering if the name McCracken has any significance or history that is known amongst Scotland.. my ancestors immigrated from Scotland to Canada, about 100 years ago, give or take.. I'm quite curious about the background, and possibly any role this name or clan, (if it was a clan) took place in dark age warfare.. I consider myself savage blooded, I would pick up a sword and goto war for my homeland any moment of any day.. I'd love to hear if it has any ties to the dark ages, of medievil times.. or possibly if anyone knows of an archive with information? I'd love to hear what anyone has to say.. I am very interested.. It's a shame that the world has come to such cowardness.. People using guns to slay their enemies, I think the world would be a much better place, if wielded in hands of enemies alike, a sword or weapon of rouge like ability still was the main source to warfare. I'd love to know everything anyone has to say, so please.. Enlighten me Until then, take care all.. and hope to hear from you soon.

  • #2
    Hello

    A simple Google search on 'surname MacCracken' gave a lot of URLs. Here's one which would seem to say that the name is a sept of Clan MacLean - but the site also hints the name is from MacNaughton - there is a possibility that the name is claimed as a sept by more than one clan. The name origin is stated as being from Galloway.

    http://www.gillean.com/Roots/septs/cracken.htm


    BTW - 'Top of the Mornin' is an Irish expression, not Scots - not that I've ever heard any Irish people using it!

    Comment


    • #3
      True, although.. it's McCracken, and yes, irish term..

      Eventhough it is an irish term, luck of the irish is something that can be virtuous within anyone.. you do not necessarily have to have Blood of the irish.
      And search for that surname, brings up various things, such as.. Crests and such, but no history of it.

      Who is a believer, that anyone with an identical surname, is related in some way shape or form, or possibly century before present there was a connection.. Do you believe that indeed identical surnames are relatives? Interested in hearing your thoughts.

      Comment


      • #4
        It doesn't matter whether your name is McCracken or MacCracken - they come from the same root - 'Mac' meaning son of... There used to be a myth that Mc meant Irish and Mac meant Scottish - that is not true! Names are spelled in many different ways because spelling was not 'set' until fairly recently - and in the case of emigrants from Scotland - the names were often written down by people who would spell strange sounding names as they 'heard' them, and the families often didn't write, so that's when 'errors' or 'differences' in spelling crept in.

        I have to confess that I have never come across anyone called MacCracken in Scotland... I am assuming there must be some left here, but I don't know of any personally.

        As for identical surnames meaning a familial relationship - then, no - I don't believe it.. For instance, many names are Patronymics - ie Thomson (son of Thomas), Davison etc... these names are not just Scots, but Welsh, Scandinavian, German etc.... Just because someone has a Scots sounding name does not mean they have Scottish ancestry!

        http://www.electricscotland.com may be able to help with your MacCracken questions. But, you may have to access information via clan MacLean. Sept names often have a major part in the history of their Clan - maybe yours is one of those, who knows?

        Good luck with your research.



        Comment


        • #5
          True, bearer of a name, can still be different origin.

          Even with a name, british, or scottish, they can still be of different herritage.. although i'm Positive, i have thick scottish genes in me... my dad and myself, are thickly scottish, you can tell if you see us, without knowing my last name.. even though that has no relevance.. i still would like to find out where it possibly originated from.. so are you saying, anyone with the Surname McCracken, or MacCracken.. or possibly MacLean, came from the same clan? do you think at a point in time, all McCrackens, started from one tree of ancestory? I like the posts, and appriciate it.. i'll check that site righ tnow..

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: True, bearer of a name, can still be different origin.

            Originally posted by McCrackenCanada
            Even with a name, british, or scottish, they can still be of different herritage.. although i'm Positive, i have thick scottish genes in me... my dad and myself, are thickly scottish, you can tell if you see us, without knowing my last name.. even though that has no relevance.. i still would like to find out where it possibly originated from.. so are you saying, anyone with the Surname McCracken, or MacCracken.. or possibly MacLean, came from the same clan? do you think at a point in time, all McCrackens, started from one tree of ancestory? I like the posts, and appriciate it.. i'll check that site righ tnow..


            I am sorry, but I'm not sure what you mean when you keep repeating that you have 'thick' Scots genes - perhaps you can explain?

            How can anyone tell that you and your father are Scots just by looking at you, I wonder? Do you believe the misconception that ALL Scots are redhaired and tall? The truth is - we come in ALL shapes and sizes - redhaired, black haired, mousy - tall, short, fat thin, fair skinned, swarthy.... Despite the film, Braveheart, there is no 'Scots' type...

            No - the MacCrackens are SEPT to the MacLeans.... (or maybe MacNaughtons - you would need to check that out yourself). And no, just because people bear the same surname does NOT mean that they share a common ancestry. For instance, families were 'taken into' clans for a variety of reasons - ie they lived under the protection of the main family and adopted their names.

            I think you need to do a little reading and learn about how the clan structure worked in the early days...

            Comment


            • #7
              Here's the questionable information from MacLean's sept list... This illustrates my point about 'fluid' spelling of surnames!

              "The following are quotes from
              The Surnames of Scotland:
              Their Origin, Meaning, and History
              By George F. Black, Ph.D.
              New York, New York Public Library; 1946


              MACCRACHEN.
              See under MACCRACKAN.



              MACCRACKAN,
              MACCRACKEN, MACCRACHEN, MACCRAKEN. An old Galloway surname. Various explanaitions have been given of the origin of this name, the most likely of which is that it is "nothing but a variant oeing to the action of two well-known dialectal processes of the name MACNAUGHTON," q.v. Settlements from Argyll into Galloway were made about the middle of the eighth century and later, and Watson has pointed out that with regard to dedications in Galloway that there was a close connection between this region and Kintyre. Bláán, Donnán, Faolán, Mochoe, Brigid, Columkille, are common in both districts and he adds "this is likely to be more than a coincidence" (I, p. 171, 179). Michael Makcraken was a follower of the earl of Cassilis respited for murder, 1526 (RSS., I, 3386). Gilbert M'Crekane was burgess of Wigtown, and Michael M'Crekane notary public there, 1536, and burgess, 1546 (Laing, 408; RMS., IV, 80). John M'Crekane was vicar of Sorbie, 1536, notary public in Wigtown, 1539 (RMS., III, 1970), and commissary of Farnes and Rennys, 1542-45 (ibid., 3163). John Makcrakane in Wigtoun had respite for art and part of the breking of Adam Ahannay, 1540 (RSS., II, 3299). Neil Dow McCraikane in Achonacone was town officer of Wigtown, 1628 (RPC., II, p. 283). Dr. Henry Noble McCracken is president of Vassar College, Poughkeepsie, New York State. McCraccan, McKraken, and McKeracken 1684 (Parish), Makcarkan 1500, McCrekan 1564, McKrachin 1607; M'Craken, M'Crokane, M'Krekane. Macfarlane (Am Briathrachan beag) Explains the name as from G. MacFhraingein, 'son of Franklin.' "

              http://www.gillean.com/Roots/septs/cracken.htm

              Comment


              • #8
                Interesting..

                I believe I read that the other day, found it interesting... I get the whole concept, of Septs to a greater clan, and then all the different ways the name was spelt.. McCracken is my surname, naturally.. but for some reason, i have heard people call me McCrachin or whatever.. maybe just out of coincidence.. who knows. I am thinking of taking a trip to scotland sometime in future, wondering if there are archives there, that could help me track down my roots.. if i go to Scotland itself? And, is it known if there were a lot of surnames McCracken, (way back when) or McCrachin or whatever the persons surname is.. Were there naturally a lot of people with these names? All information is appriciated. Pol, No.. I did not direct that to be a stereotypical comment towards Scottish herritaged people.. However, what i did mean is, Scottish are not a dime a dozen, Usually found with a stubborn mentallity, Ego's larger than themselves, and witts as thick as steel is all i was implying.. I am very stubborn, and anyone else i know who has came from Scotland, naturally has similarities in circumstances with the way things are prefered to be done in ones mind.. Thanks !

                Comment


                • #9
                  The only way to 'prove' whether or not you are of Scots origin (apart from believing that your name is Scots) is -

                  Trace back your genealogy in the country to which you believe a Scot emigrated... in your case, Canada. When you get back to the first immigrant, then you should be able to find out how the immigrant entered Canada - ie from passengers' lists etc... From there you should be able to find out from which port he/she emigrated... that may, in turn, lead back to a specific area in Scotland - from where you might be able to find information from parish registers. There is no quick way, I'm afraid.

                  Sooo, you assume that ALL Scots are stubborn etc? That's no more true than thinking we all look alike

                  As for how many MacCrackens there might have been in days gone by... you would need to access Scottish censuses - it may give you clues. Personally, I have NEVER met anyone in scotland with that name, but obviously that does not mean there are NO MacCrackens around - just that it is no longer a common name (if it ever was!)

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    heh

                    heh thanks.. That should help somewhat, I'll take a mental note to trace back from whom immigrated to Canada.. I believe it was my grandfather.. he served in world war II, So I should ask my father.. Thanks for some info.. and I'm not sure if the name was common.. I'm only 18 years old, so your guess is probably better then mine.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Polwarth

                      Hi Polwarth,
                      I was wondering how you arrived at the username of Polwarth, as it is very close to my Chief Lord Polworth Chief of the sept of Clan Scott, Scott of Harden.

                      Cowdenknowes.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Hello
                        Polwarth is a village south of Edinburgh (my home town) and also a suburb of Edinburgh - where I owned my first flat.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Polwarth

                          A'h now I understand, if you take the A6105 and head south west, you are only a short distance from my own stomping ground of Cowdenknowes, which is about one mile south of Earlston.

                          Polwarth.

                          "A parish in Berwickshire, of a triangular form, each side of which is about three miles in length. The soil is mostly clay, lying on a cold impervious tilly bed; but there is a considerable extent of gravelly and sandy soil. The greater part is inclosed. The principal crops are oats and barley, a few pease, and sometimes a little wheat. There are several extensive woods and plantations. The village of Polwarth, which contains about 200 inhabitants, is situated on a very wet and swampy piece of ground. In the middle of it are two old thorn trees, at about 6 yards distant from each other, around which it was formerly the custom for every new married pair, with their company, to dance in a ring: from hence the old song of 'Polwarth on the Green'. But this custom has fallen greatly into disuse. Population in 1801, 291.

                          I have never been there but I can imagine that it is very pretty, and as an added bonus in this location you are almost Borders.

                          Cowdenknowes.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            mccrackencanada

                            I am a McCracken from utah. My great-great grandfather was John Mills, an ordained minister on 4-6-1871, exactly 100 years before my youngest childs birthday. It is ironic that my brother, Michael, was born 3-19-42, the date of your message (but not the year). My grandmother, Mary Mills, married Frank McCracken, whose father was from Scotland. I am here in Ogden UT. There are six Mike McCrackens in Henderson NV outside Las Vegas. I would be interested in finding out about the McCrackens for my geneology.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              MACCRACKEN, MACCRACHEN, MACCRAKEN. An old Galloway surname. Various explanaitions have been given of the origin of this name, the most likely of which is that it is "nothing but a variant oeing to the action of two well-known dialectal processes of the name MACNAUGHTON," q.v. Settlements from Argyll into Galloway were made about the middle of the eighth century and later, and Watson has pointed out that with regard to dedications in Galloway that there was a close connection between this region and Kintyre. Bláán, Donnán, Faolán, Mochoe, Brigid, Columkille, are common in both districts and he adds "this is likely to be more than a coincidence" (I, p. 171, 179). Michael Makcraken was a follower of the earl of Cassilis respited for murder, 1526 (RSS., I, 3386). Gilbert M'Crekane was burgess of Wigtown, and Michael M'Crekane notary public there, 1536, and burgess, 1546 (Laing, 408; RMS., IV, 80). John M'Crekane was vicar of Sorbie, 1536, notary public in Wigtown, 1539 (RMS., III, 1970), and commissary of Farnes and Rennys, 1542-45 (ibid., 3163). John Makcrakane in Wigtoun had respite for art and part of the breking of Adam Ahannay, 1540 (RSS., II, 3299). Neil Dow McCraikane in Achonacone was town officer of Wigtown, 1628 (RPC., II, p. 283). Dr. Henry Noble McCracken is president of Vassar College, Poughkeepsie, New York State. McCraccan, McKraken, and McKeracken 1684 (Parish), Makcarkan 1500, McCrekan 1564, McKrachin 1607; M'Craken, M'Crokane, M'Krekane. Macfarlane (Am Briathrachan beag) Explains the name as from G. MacFhraingein, 'son of Franklin.'

                              Cowdenknowes

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