What Does “Jolly Good Show” and “Hoots Man” Exactly Mean?

What Does “Jolly Good Show” and “Hoots Man” Exactly Mean? I’ve read a sentence”1707 England and Scotland united under one Parliament” and a dialogue in a picture near it:  “Jolly good show” and “Hoots mon.” Can someone tell the meaning of the above two sentences? “Jolly good show” is a phrase which is used to […]

What Does “Jolly Good Show” and “Hoots Man” Exactly Mean?

I’ve read a sentence”1707 England and Scotland united under one Parliament” and a dialogue in a picture near it:  “Jolly good show” and “Hoots mon.” Can someone tell the meaning of the above two sentences?

“Jolly good show” is a phrase which is used to express approval of something but it would tend to be used by upper-class English people rather than in everyday speech.

They are stereotypes of how English and Scottish people are supposed to speak. No real Scot would say “hoots mon” just as no Englishman would say “jolly good show”, unless they were acting in some corny play.

“Mon” is in quite common use still though Neil, although I think “Man” has become more common. “Hoots!” from the Gaidhlig “Ud!” is completely out of use as far as I know. It’s an old exclamation/interjection of surprise.”Jolly good show” and “Yah” are phrases used by posh English folk. Even to this day. Some colonials in Edinburgh, especially Edinburgh University students, and also students at St Andrew’s have been heard using it. Some even say “old boy” too!

I agree that “Hoot!” and “Hoots!” are no longer used. I’ve never heard them, ever, in real life. However, they do occur in novels from the 19th century by Scottish authors. I’m pretty sure that R L Stevenson has characters saying “Hoot!” in at least one story. I can’t remember whether I’ve seen it in Walter Scott. I suggest that these writers were alert enough not to make things up (although Stevenson and Scott both did like to rip the pish out of the supposed inability of the Highlander to manage English). So it’s probably been a real expression that has faded from use.

Oh, “Hoots” was once a real expression alright…Just like “Och aye” was a real Edinburgh expression. Now they just say “Ock aye” because they’re getting that Anglicised. “thud [pr. “hoot”]an interjection of dislike or impatience: Scottish hoot, hoot-hoot, Swed. hut, whence English hoot. The Gaelic is borrowed.”http://www.ceantar.org/Dicts/MB2/mb38.htmlI think it’s debatable if the Gaidhlig is “borrowed”. It’s just a sound like “ach!” which the Germans use too.

Och Aye! Don’t think I have ever heard any Scotsman ever say “och aye” – and I have lived here (in Scotland) all my life. And as for it being an Edinburgh expression now corrupted to “ock aye” – well, I’ve worked in Edinburgh most of my life and again I’ve never heard anyone say that. The other thing also which annoys is the supposition that Edinburgh folk have lost their Scottishness. I don’t come from Edinburgh myself, but I know lots of Scots speakers from Edinburgh. And one other thing too, Edinburgh is not full of English people, obviously, there are some but you have to remember Edinburgh is a tourist location which is very popular with the English – long may it continue – we all need their money! Don’t forget that English people living in Scotland often have children born and brought up here, these kids usually end up with Scots accents and are 100% Scottish. Culture is a funny thing, it kind of rubs off on you.

Sadly, not always. My brother’s weans seem to have at least half-English accent, because of the number of English incomers where they live. I did read once that it seems that children tend to take the accent of their peers more than of their parents, but I have no link to that just now. There’s also an annoying trend for weans to adopt Oz-soap-speak. You know, the rising inflection at the end of every sentence. On the use of ‘Och, aye!’, I find it’s quite commonplace – I certainly use it. ‘Och aye the noo’ is a bit of a caricature.