Translation Help Please

Gaelic translation

Translation Help Please I am looking to translate the following phrase into Scots-Gaelic. The English is “Beware the wrath of the patient man.” I have found an Irish Gaelic translation, but do not know if it is the same in scots. I really want to be sure to get it correct before I spend the […]

Translation Help Please

I am looking to translate the following phrase into Scots-Gaelic. The English is “Beware the wrath of the patient man.” I have found an Irish Gaelic translation, but do not know if it is the same in scots. I really want to be sure to get it correct before I spend the money to have it printed. Here is the irish – “Coimhéad fearg fhear na foighde”.

Bithibh air faiceall fearg duine foighidneach/ Bi air faiceall fearg duine foighidneach (informal)is one way of expressing the idea. “Bi cùramach” means “Be careful” so you could say “Bi cùramach feirge na duine foighidneach.”/”Bithibh…” (formal)”Bi” in Gaelic and “Be” in English are from the same root and both mean “be”.All the words in the Irish sentence exist in Gaelic. “coimhead would be used for saying “Tha mi a’coimhead Tbh” (I am watching tv) and “fear” is related to the English adjective “virile”. Perhaps its a better one for a literary turn of phrase than duine, but both can mean man.

Literally the Irish reads “Watch the anger of a man of patience!” “fhear” would become “fir” in Gaelic.

So if I used “Bithibh air faiceall fearg duine foighidneach” on something generic like a sign or a T-shirt it would convey my original thought of “Beware the wrath of a patient man” right? I’m a bit of a novice with formal/informal usage rules. Honestly the Irish looks ‘cleaner’ in written form, but I’m insistent on Scottish. Also, where or how would I learn how to pronouce this phrase properly, short of travelling to Scotland? I want to travel very much, just can’t afford it this year.

I would go with “Bi” rather than “Bithibh” (pronounced approximately like “biiyiv”) as its more direct (Its the informal form of the imperative). Bi air faiceall … really means “Keep an eye on …” “(be on look out for …”) and the B is pronounced almost like in English but with a slight P sound. Ill add some links to good websites for learning how to pronounce Gaelic.

“Cum sùil air…” (Keep an eye on) Cum is pronounced a bit like “koom” and sùil “sool” with a longer oo sound.

Not that it wouldn’t make for a tattoo worthy of discussion; where would one place such a long phrase that it would be viewed?  I suppose it could start on one sleeve, go across the back and then down the other arm…but honestly, the average person would lose interest at the first elbow.

Where did the “Cum sùil air…” come in? Yet another manner of expressing this thought? Just curious as it was not in the initial two options you provided.

Yup, just another expression that could be used to cover “Beware”, “keep an eye on” “Watch out for”. Literally “Keep eye on…”. Cumaibh would be the polite or plural form, but Cum is probably better as its more direct.