Awesome Outer and Inner Hebrides

The Hebrides are named for the Norse word Harbredey which, when roughly translated, means the "isles at the edge of the sea". This aptly describes the Outer Hebrides since they are the most westerly islands off the Scottish mainland. The Outer Herbrides are a number of many smaller islands that are situated in relatively close proximity to each other.

The main regions of the Outer Hebrides are Lewis, Harris, North and South Uist, Taransay, Benbecula and St Kilda. Each of these places have their own special attraction. Harris, for example, is home to the Callanish Stones - a circle of stones which predate the pyramids of Egypt. In Barra at Castle Bay you will find the ancient Kisimul Castle that was once the seat of the Macniel Clan. The Islands Islands of St Kilda have an impressive variety of birdlife and an abandoned village that comes complete with stories of how it got that way. If you appreciate seals, you might want to visit North Uist where around 9000 seal pups are born every year.

The Inner Hebrides is another group of islands that can be found off the west coast of Scotland. The Inner Hebrides is usually divided into the Northern Islands and the Southern Islands. Isle of Skye and a few other smaller islands can be found in the Northern Inner Hebrides. Mull, Islay and Jura can be found in the Southern Inner Hebrides. The Isle of Skye is a popular tourist destination due to its amazing natural beauty. There are many castles to be seen throughout the Inner Hebrides, such as Eilean Donan Caslte, Castle Moil and Dunvegan Castle. The Dunvegan Castle is the longest inhabited Scottish castle, still being inhabited by members of the Clan MacLeod. A 1,500 year old silk called the Fairy Flag and Rory Mor's Horn are kept here. It is easy to see that both the Outer and Inner Hebrides hold both historical and natural appeal to anyone who ventures to their shores.

 



User Comments & Reviews: 3 Comment(s)

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Lisa Lockheart

Lisa Lockheart - 2013-01-27 14:28:50

I'll be in Scotland next September, and would like to visit the outter hebrides, particulary Lewis, where I have ancestors, also the Morrisons of Lewis. My tour will end up in Glasgow. Two questions: What's the best way to get there from the Glasgow area (is Ullapool the best option?), and Should I be concerned about conditions of the ferry crossing in late September? Thanks!

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J.Johnstone - 2010-08-22 23:22:13

you will find info @ http://www.leverburgh.co.uk/ http://www.seallam.com/ it is a geneological centre , and has information of all the families in the western Isles, also about the clearnaces and immigrants to USA and Canada

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DANIEL ROY - 2009-12-01 20:09:39

I AM INTERESTED IN FINDING OUT INFORMATION ABOUT MY ANCESTORS, THE MORRISONS OF HARRIS AND LEWIS IN THE OUTER HEBRIDES. ALSO ANY INFO ON TAKING A TRIP THERE FROM THE USA. THANX.

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