Go Back   Scotland Discussion Forum > Culture > Sport

Notices


Is this suppose to be Gold?

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread Rate Thread Display Modes
  #1 (permalink)  
Old 20th February 2012, 07:00
TurboLine TurboLine is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Posts: 40
Is this suppose to be Gold?

I have asked this in other places but not have got the answer I was looking for so I thought it would make it as simple as possible here.

I am a Rugby League fan and have noticed that for the first time that I have realised that Scotland will play in a colour that is not navy blue or another form of blue. They will now have a alternative (from the usual) jersey that looks horrible. I am not a big Rugby Union fan but don;t mind it here and there and I know that Rugby Union is fairly big over in Scotland while League doesn't set off too many beaps on the radar.

I watched Rugby Sevens a few weeks ago and saw the coaching team in a similar colour and then again the full fifteen man side during the 6 nations match against Wales which I enjoyed.

In Australia gold (in sport) as a colour is often referred to a very bright gold - almost yellow. Very rarely is the "old gold" colour used, although the cricket team had a similar colour for a short time.

The Rugby Union and Rugby League jerseys are below. The people I have showed this colour too have labelled it "light brown" and one insultive person I know called it a "smeared turd"




If this is a gold colour, does anybody know if there is any origin behind this colour as a "national colour" or if it's done fr purely design reasons or whatever.

Thanks in advance guys.
Reply With Quote
  #2 (permalink)  
Old 21st February 2012, 06:29
Lachlan09's Avatar
Lachlan09 Lachlan09 is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Muscat, Sultanate of Oman
Posts: 1,259
Maybe I'm reading too much into the designers' intentions, but it might just be providing a contrast with the dark blue. Some football teams use/have used what they described as gold in their colours, such as Wolves and East Fife, but it's more of a dull yellowy-orange.

On the other hand, New Orleans Saints of the NFL use gold similar to your pix of the Scottish rugby shirts.

The Scottish national football team has worn yellow/dark blue design combinations on several occasions presumably as the yellow represents the background of the rampant lion flag. Funny enough, I can't recall the team wearing red from the same flag.

The yellow on the flag symbolises gold as per the actual coat-of-arms. Traditional heraldry doesn't (as far as I'm aware) recognise yellow and white and these colours when used represented gold and silver. On the shields, gold and silver paint would be used, but on clothing it would be yellow and white. Perhaps the SRU strips are trying to imitate gold rather than yellow to represent gold.

I reckon they should use gold lamé for that upbeat touch !
Reply With Quote
  #3 (permalink)  
Old 21st February 2012, 14:30
TurboLine TurboLine is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Posts: 40
Thanks for the reply Lachlan. I come from apart of the world that is, for a lack of a better world touchy, about sporting teams wearing the national colours.

Understandable use or gold on the jerseys if it's because of the rampant lion flag. It looks alright.

You do realize that the second picture/jersey is a Rugby League jersey from the Scottish Rugby League (SRL) and not a alternative rugby union (SRU) jersey? I only ask because I'm unsure as to whether or not people know the difference between the two in Scotland, as some parts of the world only know one or the other.

Cheers.
Reply With Quote
  #4 (permalink)  
Old 21st February 2012, 14:50
Polwarth Polwarth is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2000
Posts: 7,066
We know, but Union is the only one I follow - even if our national team is doing pretty poorly
__________________
Please do not assume that any underlined links in my posts are MY recommendations. They are not. It is this American site taking advantage of members' posts about Scotland to boost their advertising revenue.
Reply With Quote
  #5 (permalink)  
Old 22nd February 2012, 00:06
TurboLine TurboLine is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Posts: 40
Unfortunately I wouldn't expect any of your to follow Rugby League. It is a small sport in Scotland and finding somewhere who follows it or is involved on here would be very rare. But it's great to see that people know the difference.
Reply With Quote
  #6 (permalink)  
Old 22nd February 2012, 03:51
Lachlan09's Avatar
Lachlan09 Lachlan09 is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Muscat, Sultanate of Oman
Posts: 1,259
I never knew rugby league was played in Scotland. I thought it was only played on muddy pitches in the rain in a belt somewhere between Warrington and Hull, with a drop-down to Fulham.

When I was a kid, my late Saturday afternoon TV "delight" was rugby league played in chilling rain between two teams dressed in mud (only substitutes on the side-lines wore clean outfits to show everybody what the teams looked like at the start of the match), the player with the ball advancing a yard or two into the opposite players, being brought down and slithering about in yet more mud (to replace any that may have come off during the tackle), play gets stopped, set-piece backheeling the ball to his muddy mate who then does exactly the same thing, then play stops again and his mate backheels to another muddy mate who does the same thing, then play stops again, then its a scrum. Like watching WW1 with a ball.

The torture continued with Kent Walton commentating the all-in wrestling comprising sweaty overweight men acting out a choreographed match where victory was achieved by one of them pressing his miasmic butt in the other wrestler's face until he surrendered. It usually featured Mick McManus, Giant Haystacks, Big Daddy and Johnny Two Rivers to name a few. There was also a bearded Scottish guy who played a baddie.

I had to sit through all this just to watch the tele-printer football results appearing on the screen before my eyes as the news came in and just to see how many goals Rangers had put past my beloved Jam-Tarts, while I ate my Saturday evening cold meat, chips and beans and before my Dad switched off the telly to listen to his Scottish dance music on the wireless. My old family Saturdays in the early 1960's !

Mind you, none of these are as mind-bendingly excrutiating and robbing of an hour of people's lives as (American) WWE. You know what I mean ! That, and the retarded NASCAR, go a long way to explaining why crazed religious fanatics are trying to blow up the USA.

IMHO

Last edited by Lachlan09; 22nd February 2012 at 04:15.
Reply With Quote
  #7 (permalink)  
Old 22nd February 2012, 05:43
TurboLine TurboLine is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Posts: 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lachlan09 View Post
I never knew rugby league was played in Scotland. I thought it was only played on muddy pitches in the rain in a belt somewhere between Warrington and Hull, with a drop-down to Fulham.
Scotland have their own domestic and School based competitions and regularly play internationals against Ireland, France & Wales. They have also competed at World Cups. Rugby League is still a minor sport in Scotland although it is growing, it desperately needs a investment of funds.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lachlan09 View Post
When I was a kid, my late Saturday afternoon TV "delight" was rugby league played in chilling rain between two teams dressed in mud (only substitutes on the side-lines wore clean outfits to show everybody what the teams looked like at the start of the match), the player with the ball advancing a yard or two into the opposite players, being brought down and slithering about in yet more mud (to replace any that may have come off during the tackle), play gets stopped, set-piece backheeling the ball to his muddy mate who then does exactly the same thing, then play stops again and his mate backheels to another muddy mate who does the same thing, then play stops again, then its a scrum. Like watching WW1 with a ball.
Pitches and fields have came a long way in each of the 70 countries that play and 20 that have a domestic league. From your post about a supposed repetitive nature I'm taking it that you are a Union fan? I much prefer League as, like American Football, it is much more open and expansive with more focus on scoring tries instead of getting field position to kick goals. The forwards these days generally have more ball playing skills than Union forwards as well.
Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On



All times are GMT +1. The time now is 09:18.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.7.6
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO 3.0.0 RC4 © 2006, Crawlability, Inc.