Go Back   Scotland Discussion Forum > Culture > Music and Art

Notices


Most Famous/Best Scottish songs?

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread Rate Thread Display Modes
  #36 (permalink)  
Old 15th January 2011, 11:10
Duthill Duthill is offline
Quarantined Users
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Otautahi , Te Wahi Pounamu (NZ)
Posts: 1,410
Quote:
Originally Posted by Auld Chiel View Post
In fact, the word "n!gger" was introduced into the English language from Scots.
"n!gger" ???
What manner of creature is this semi literate retard that cannot even spot the most basic of spelling mistakes in its vomit ?
Is this the same pile of filth that was sneering at the author of a book book review in a post on another thread , solely on the grounds of the reviewers spelling ?
Is it a coward , a racist coward that does not have the courage of it's own professed convictions ?

You be the judge .
ian stewart's pages_SJA Thoughts

As to this claim , "In fact, the word "n!gger" was introduced into the English language from Scots" , the liar has not the wit to read and comprehend the etymology of the word as laid out in the very online dictionary that it provided the link to .
Thick is as thick does . eh
Reply With Quote
  #37 (permalink)  
Old 15th January 2011, 11:16
Lachlan09's Avatar
Lachlan09 Lachlan09 is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Muscat, Sultanate of Oman
Posts: 1,322
Quote:
Originally Posted by Auld Chiel View Post
Aye, the Scots here in America weren't exactly abolitionists. By 1860 about half of the top 20 largest slave-holders in the U.S. were of Scottish descent. In fact, the word "n!gger" was introduced into the English language from Scots. See: Online Etymology Dictionary
Whereas that form is said to have been used in 16th Century Scots/Northern English language, the word was not invented there of course. It came from French and Spanish origins and meant "black". I'm surprised though that it is said to have been used in Scotland at that time, presumably a common word commonly used, presumably due to local Scots rubbing shoulders with black people in the street (they must have been there to see, being as they couldn't be seen on TV and most folk never went beyond their own town). Strangely then, I was about 12 when I saw my first "live" black person close-up, in my town next to Edinburgh. All the times we went to Edinburgh, I only ever noticed a handful and they were at Uni. I think they were pretty rare in Scotland in the 1960's. (no wonder - too bloody cold !) So where had they all gone ?

You must remember though, apart from vast monetary value of slaves, many slaveholders did not see any wrong in owning other humans and indeed thought it a Christian duty to tend to their "flock". The famous ante-bellum argument about whether a slave-owner was any more immoral or cruel than a Northern factory owner paying starvation wages to overworked people living in misery and no chance to change jobs for a better future. etc etc. But then again, the poor b****rd grinding his life away in a miserable Northern factory wouldn't be chased by hounds and brought back in chains if he quit, wouldn't be whipped and wouldn't be separated from his wife and family for ever.

Of course, Scots (or descendants of Scots) adopted the manners and mores of their adopted home. If that meant owning a slave was normal, then if they were affluent enough and all their neighbours "had one", then why would they act any different ? I think it was James MacPherson, historian, who opined that during the ACW, British working class men (including Scots) generally sympathised with the Union, whilst the upper classes leant toward the Confederacy.

The ACW was as much a class-war as it was about states rights and slavery. Remember the famous saying, quoted amongst the hard-pressed ordinary men of the South in the latter part of the war ? - "Rich Man's War - Poor Man's Fight"

But again, this is a Scotland site - not an American anti-/pro-slavery discussion site.

Last edited by Lachlan09; 15th January 2011 at 11:52.
Reply With Quote
  #38 (permalink)  
Old 15th January 2011, 14:14
wullie m wullie m is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Posts: 874
Slavery was of course the norm in Scotland itself, for colliers & salters until just over 200 years ago. wullie.
Reply With Quote
  #39 (permalink)  
Old 15th January 2011, 14:20
Duthill Duthill is offline
Quarantined Users
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Otautahi , Te Wahi Pounamu (NZ)
Posts: 1,410
Thats true , and indentured and bonded servants were slaves by another name .
Reply With Quote
  #40 (permalink)  
Old 15th January 2011, 14:29
Duthill Duthill is offline
Quarantined Users
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Otautahi , Te Wahi Pounamu (NZ)
Posts: 1,410
Quote:
Originally Posted by Auld Chiel View Post
but the word n!gger ... was apparently first used in the Scots language circa 1568.
There it goes again , lying .
Reply With Quote
  #41 (permalink)  
Old 16th January 2011, 05:35
Cadbren Cadbren is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Auckland, New Zealand
Posts: 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lachlan09 View Post
It came from French and Spanish origins and meant "black". I'm surprised though that it is said to have been used in Scotland at that time, presumably a common word commonly used, presumably due to local Scots rubbing shoulders with black people in the street (they must have been there to see, being as they couldn't be seen on TV and most folk never went beyond their own town). Strangely then, I was about 12 when I saw my first "live" black person close-up, in my town next to Edinburgh. All the times we went to Edinburgh, I only ever noticed a handful and they were at Uni. I think they were pretty rare in Scotland in the 1960's. (no wonder - too bloody cold !) So where had they all gone ?
There are plenty of slang words in english which come from the language of sailors, it can't be that difficult to think of all those Scottish soldiers and sailors serving the Empire in Africa and elsewhere picking up dainties to enrich the language back home.
My grandparents generation, the "war generation" used the word on a regular basis and without any particular venom associated with the word. The squadron commander of the Dambusters had a black dog of that name, my own great aunt had two black cats of that name, shortened to Nigs and Little Nigs. I read an account of Highlanders serving in North Africa and the word was used for the locals, that is the Highland Officer's memoirs included the word not the author of the book. It was used in a matter of fact way as a descriptive term and not as a cuss word. It would appear that the word had wide favour within the english speaking world only two generations ago.

As for the song, 'Flower of Scotland' by the Corries is a brilliant song and for more maudlin times 'Culloden's Harvest' by Deanta.
Reply With Quote
  #42 (permalink)  
Old 16th January 2011, 06:11
Duthill Duthill is offline
Quarantined Users
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Otautahi , Te Wahi Pounamu (NZ)
Posts: 1,410
Auld Chiel , the low life who pushed this thread down the racist road has been banned . How about we let his lies depart with him .

The word 'neger' is a Germanic word that possibly came into the languages of Britain with the Danes over a thousand years ago . It merely means 'black', and was therefore a neutral term for black people.
The pitiful attempt to claim that it was the Scots that turned it into the pejorative 'nig-ger' is yet another of the many lies purveyed on this and other internet sites by 'Steven L. Akins of that ilk'.



Time we got we on with this great topic folks , eh
Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On



All times are GMT +1. The time now is 04:11.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.7.6
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO 3.0.0 RC4 © 2006, Crawlability, Inc.