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  #29 (permalink)  
Old 14th January 2011, 17:36
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"Drunk Scotsman" and "We're no awa' tae bide awa" - my favourite ones
"Mairi's Weddind" - good as well
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  #30 (permalink)  
Old 15th January 2011, 07:04
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Originally Posted by Auld Chiel View Post
A good deal of the "Alabama accent" is Celtic in origin. Alabama was settled predominately by descendants of colonists who came to America in the 1600's and 1700's from Scotland, Ireland, Wales, and England.
To quote AC's well-beloved Wikipedia, here is an item on Scottish-Americans:-

There has been a long tradition of influences between Scottish American and African American communities. The great influx of Scots Presbyterians into the Carolinas introduced the African slaves to Christianity and their way of worship and singing. Even today, psalm singing and gospel music are the backbone of African American churchgoers. It has been long thought by the wider African American community that American Gospel music originated in Africa and was brought to the Americas by slaves. However recent studies by Professor Willie Ruff, a Black American ethno-musicologist at Yale University, concludes that African American Gospel singing was in fact introduced and encouraged by Scottish Gaelic speaking settlers from North Uist.[36] His study also concludes that the first foreign tongue spoken by slaves in America was not English but Scottish Gaelic taught to them by Gaelic speakers who left the Western Isles because of religious persecution.[36] Traditional Scottish Gaelic psalm singing, or "precenting the line" as it is correctly known, in which the psalms are called out and the congregation sings a response, was the earliest form of congregational singing adopted by Africans in America. Professor Ruff focuses on Scottish settler influences that pre-date all other congregational singing by African Americans in America and found, in a North Carolina newspaper dated about 1740, an advertisement offering a generous reward for the capture and return of a runaway African slave who is described as being easy to identify because he only spoke Gaelic.[37] Such cultural influences have remained until modern times, even a church in Alabama where the African American congregation worshipped in Gaelic as late as 1918, giving a clue to the extent to which the Gaels spread their culture - from North Carolina to Alabama, Georgia and Mississippi.[38]
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Old 15th January 2011, 07:08
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Ah, so you consider those who advocate against race-mixing to be "trash"? How peculiar, among my social-circle the opposite is true.
Would this social circle happen to wear whiter-than-white gowns, pointed hoods and are all very, very closely-related to each other, Bubba Joe ?
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Old 15th January 2011, 07:16
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I remember an interesting programme not long ago about a community of African-Americans in east Alabama who until recently could speak Scots Gaelic and worshipped in call and reponse form typical of the Highland church. Though the community has been eroded by time, a few surviving old-timers still have the Gaelic. A number of African-American scholars believe that Southern gospel music has been influenced by the Gaelic church (Scottish not Irish).
Yes , they are said to be the descendants of some of our ancestors who were sentenced to the Americas as slaves by such scum as Cromwell , Cumberland and their ilk .
Willie Ruff , Jazzman , Yale School of Music Professor and (well recieved ) Published Author , has done some some extensive research onto the history of our Gaelic speaking Afro-Scots descended cousins in the USA .
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Old 15th January 2011, 07:30
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Sorry Dut, I edited as you were posting a reply ! My fault !
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  #34 (permalink)  
Old 15th January 2011, 07:40
Duthill Duthill is offline
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Sorry Dut, I edited as you were posting a reply ! My fault !
No worries brother , we are both on the same page eh

It is highly probable that the Scots slavemasters were fact far less in number than has been thought in the past .
And that the many many Black folks in the USA and Canada get their Scottish names from their own RedLeg Ancestors and not some redneck master .
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Old 15th January 2011, 11:31
Auld Chiel Auld Chiel is offline
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Originally Posted by Lachlan09 View Post
To quote AC's well-beloved Wikipedia, here is an item on Scottish-Americans:-

There has been a long tradition of influences between Scottish American and African American communities. The great influx of Scots Presbyterians into the Carolinas introduced the African slaves to Christianity and their way of worship and singing. Even today, psalm singing and gospel music are the backbone of African American churchgoers. It has been long thought by the wider African American community that American Gospel music originated in Africa and was brought to the Americas by slaves. However recent studies by Professor Willie Ruff, a Black American ethno-musicologist at Yale University, concludes that African American Gospel singing was in fact introduced and encouraged by Scottish Gaelic speaking settlers from North Uist.[36] His study also concludes that the first foreign tongue spoken by slaves in America was not English but Scottish Gaelic taught to them by Gaelic speakers who left the Western Isles because of religious persecution.[36] Traditional Scottish Gaelic psalm singing, or "precenting the line" as it is correctly known, in which the psalms are called out and the congregation sings a response, was the earliest form of congregational singing adopted by Africans in America. Professor Ruff focuses on Scottish settler influences that pre-date all other congregational singing by African Americans in America and found, in a North Carolina newspaper dated about 1740, an advertisement offering a generous reward for the capture and return of a runaway African slave who is described as being easy to identify because he only spoke Gaelic.[37] Such cultural influences have remained until modern times, even a church in Alabama where the African American congregation worshipped in Gaelic as late as 1918, giving a clue to the extent to which the Gaels spread their culture - from North Carolina to Alabama, Georgia and Mississippi.[38]
Aye, the Scots here in America weren't exactly abolitionists. By 1860 about half of the top 20 largest slave-holders in the U.S. were of Scottish descent. In fact, the word "n!gger" was introduced into the English language from Scots. See: Online Etymology Dictionary
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