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  #22 (permalink)  
Old 1st September 2015, 15:46
smaoin smaoin is offline
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Stanley Baxter demonstrates the problem of change without a stable written standard. The other two are much nearer and less different than a Cockney and Modern urban London speaker would be.
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Old 1st September 2015, 16:15
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the problem is, that you dont seem to understand is that all the people in those videos will write in english yet pronounce the words differently and/or use the scots dialect when speaking the same words.

i write in (near) perfect english yet if you heard me talk youd never know it was english i was speaking most of the time.
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Old 1st September 2015, 16:16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by smaoin View Post
If anything, they are probably more Scots sounding than the home owners down the road because of the social phenomenon of self Anglicization of speech amongst socially ambitious Scots. Thats been going on since the Enlightenment in Edinburgh. Scots has become something of a sociolect in the Central Belt.
exactly so how can you say the people of "the scheme" represent the way people of killie talk.

simply....you cant.
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Old 1st September 2015, 16:23
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You can say that is anyone was to sound Scots, it would be the poorest because of Scots having become a sociolect over the last couple of centuries. This explains the accent of Jackie Bird.
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Old 1st September 2015, 16:26
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The problem is that the various accents in modern Scotland are growing nearer with each generation to Modern English and further from being examples of Scots dialects. Nobody in the modern Glaswegian examples used forms such as "richt" or "maun". These would have existed in the eighteenth century and possibly nineteenth even in Glasgow. Were they part of a written standard, then local speakers would be brought back into contact with the less Anglicized forms of words and alternatives words thanks to a written shared register. Otherwise they will continue to become more English.
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Old 2nd September 2015, 09:54
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again your failing to realise the reality of modern life in scotland.

jackie bird is a tv presenter whos accent is for UK tv audiences.

glaswigians use maun(tho whether it means must is debatable)) and richt as common words.

english is the language most people speak but if you listen to what people are actually saying youd soon realise (as ive already said) there is load and loads of auld scots thrown in
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Old 2nd September 2015, 10:41
smaoin smaoin is offline
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Jackie Bird isnae seen across the UK but. Just in Central Scotland. Her accent is in my view rather regrettable middle class one put on one that clashes with the way most people she interviews speak, especially her vowels. Scots words are heard in English in Scotland as are Gaelic ones. It doesnt mean Gaelic is being spoken when a body points out whit a bourach they've made of something. Scots doesnt exist as a separate language from English in the Central Belt and if it has any chance of becoming a recognizably independent language again (as it was in the seventeenth century), then it needs a standardized written form and some work on how it should be spelled to reflect the most traditional forms such as "richt" instead of "right" and "raither nor" rather than "rather than". ie Doric could be of great help to the creation of a traditionally based orthography for a unified language.
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