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  #15 (permalink)  
Old 1st September 2015, 14:28
smaoin smaoin is offline
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Actually according to that guy, its spelled "Fawkirk" and such spellings are promotted online by the Scots Language Forum on facebook set up by the Scots Language Centre. The problem is that there is no official written standard and so standard written English is used.
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  #16 (permalink)  
Old 1st September 2015, 14:29
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I can listen to Scottish tv shows such as "the Scheme" which is available on youtube to get an idea as to the way Scots speakers speak every day. For all you know, I am Scottish. I choose to leave you in the dark on that as its not stricty relevent nor should it be the focus as to whether Scots is the same language as English (English being the only available standardized written form for the various dialects which have very little in common in the case of for instance, Shetlandic (whoses speakers didnt even regard their language as Scots until last century) and Ayrhshire Scots (which is presumably whats heard on "the Scheme" as it was filmed in Kilmarnock.
wrong on every level...the program "the scheme" is not representative of everyone in ayrshire anymore than it is from anywhere else...even people in kilmarnock will have different dialects, which just goes to prove you know nothing of "scots" other than what youve seen on tv.
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Old 1st September 2015, 14:34
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It was representative of how people living on a scheme in Kilmarnock speak and its quite different from the traditional poetic form from the late nineteenth century with words such as "richt" and "micht" which demonstrates change due to the influence of Glaswegian. Essentially they were all speaking English just like in Liverpool and Manchester, ie with a bit of local color added to their speech. This is evidence for the need of a standardized written form to hold the changing dialects together and avoid the fate of them becoming part of modern English. (if of course the goal is to maintain them as part of an independent language, which I suspect you cannot share).
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  #18 (permalink)  
Old 1st September 2015, 14:46
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no it was only representative of how a few x/junkies spoke in an area...nothing else.

i take it your vell versed of the backlash it caused simply because of this?
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Old 1st September 2015, 14:57
smaoin smaoin is offline
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Its no use blaming individuals for the way they speak, especially when they are just reflecting the changes that have happened locally thanks in more probability to the Anglicized pronunciation of middle class people who are more influential on the way language changes with each new generation. I doubt their dialect was the cause of any complaints or that the people who couldnae thole them had radically differing accents or pronunciation. I also doubt that anyone in Kilmarnock says the word "bricht" the day despite it being the form used in rural Ayrshire dialects of the nineteenth century. One of the reasons for a standardized written language is to help maintain what language campaigners see as the most important aspects of speech as well as writing as the more something is written, the more it is recognized by speakers and copied, as it becomes an official word. The problem for Lowland Scots dialect forms such as "bricht" in the nineteenth century was that they were viewed as alternatives to "bright" and under constant threat of being replaced by urban forms due to people moving out into the countryside and bringing "bright" with them, as has happened. If "bricht" was a correct way to write the word, then it would help reverse the absorption of what were locally stabe dialects.
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Old 1st September 2015, 15:01
smaoin smaoin is offline
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If anything, they are probably more Scots sounding than the home owners down the road because of the social phenomenon of self Anglicization of speech amongst socially ambitious Scots. Thats been going on since the Enlightenment in Edinburgh. Scots has become something of a sociolect in the Central Belt.
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  #21 (permalink)  
Old 1st September 2015, 15:39
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Originally Posted by smaoin View Post
Its no use blaming individuals for the way they speak, especially when they are just reflecting the changes that have happened locally thanks in more probability to the Anglicized pronunciation of middle class people who are more influential on the way language changes with each new generation. I doubt their dialect was the cause of any complaints or that the people who couldnae thole them had radically differing accents or pronunciation. I also doubt that anyone in Kilmarnock says the word "bricht" the day despite it being the form used in rural Ayrshire dialects of the nineteenth century. One of the reasons for a standardized written language is to help maintain what language campaigners see as the most important aspects of speech as well as writing as the more something is written, the more it is recognized by speakers and copied, as it becomes an official word. The problem for Lowland Scots dialect forms such as "bricht" in the nineteenth century was that they were viewed as alternatives to "bright" and under constant threat of being replaced by urban forms due to people moving out into the countryside and bringing "bright" with them, as has happened. If "bricht" was a correct way to write the word, then it would help reverse the absorption of what were locally stabe dialects.
again that is not correct.
people say bricht all over the place.
the people in the program will not even represent their neighbours due to their addictions,habits,lifestyle so thinking that even the whole street speaks that way never mind the whole of killie is way off the mark as i have already said.

heres some very different glasgow accents that will show you how people in even the same area speak differently due to various differences in their upbringing....see if you can explain why that is?





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