Go Back   Scotland Discussion Forum > Culture > Language

Notices


Translation help please

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread Rate Thread Display Modes
  #1 (permalink)  
Old 15th July 2011, 23:12
opr8or opr8or is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Posts: 8
Translation help please

I am looking to translate the following phrase into scots-gaelic.
The English is "Beware the wrath of the patient man"
I have found an Irish gaelic translation, but do not know if it is the same in scots. I really want to be sure to get it correct before I spend the money to have it printed. Here is the irish - "CoimhÚad fearg fhear na foighde".

Thank you for your assistance.
William
Reply With Quote
  #2 (permalink)  
Old 16th July 2011, 00:01
Sgoinneil Sgoinneil is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Posts: 187
Bithibh air faiceall fearg duine foighidneach/ Bi air faiceall fearg duine foighidneach (informal)
is one way of expressing the idea. "Bi c¨ramach" means "Be careful" so you could say "Bi c¨ramach feirge na duine foighidneach."/"Bithibh..." (formal)
"Bi" in Gaelic and "Be" in English are from the same root and both mean "be".

All the words in the Irish sentence exist in Gaelic. "coimhead would be used for saying "Tha mi a'coimhead Tbh" (I am watching tv) and "fear" is related to the English adjective "virile". Perhaps its a better one for a literary turn of phrase than duine, but both can mean man.

Last edited by Sgoinneil; 16th July 2011 at 00:56.
Reply With Quote
  #3 (permalink)  
Old 16th July 2011, 00:38
Sgoinneil Sgoinneil is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Posts: 187
Literally the Irish reads "Watch the anger of a man of patience!" "fhear" would become "fir" in Gaelic.
Reply With Quote
  #4 (permalink)  
Old 16th July 2011, 22:32
opr8or opr8or is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Posts: 8
So if I used "Bithibh air faiceall fearg duine foighidneach" on something generic like a sign or a T-shirt it would convey my original thought of "Beware the wrath of a patient man" right?
I'm a bit of a novice with formal/informal usage rules.

Honestly the Irish looks 'cleaner' in written form, but I'm insistent on scottish.
Thank you so much for your assistance and clarification.
William
Reply With Quote
  #5 (permalink)  
Old 16th July 2011, 22:41
opr8or opr8or is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Posts: 8
Also, where or how would I learn how to pronouce this phrase properly, short of travelling to scotland? I want to travel very much, just can't afford it this year.
William
Reply With Quote
  #6 (permalink)  
Old 17th July 2011, 04:05
JCfromGA JCfromGA is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Posts: 389
LOL At least she's not getting it tattooed!! I'm amazed at people who get things printed on them in a language they don't know.. leaves lots of room for mischief
Reply With Quote
  #7 (permalink)  
Old 17th July 2011, 05:55
Sgoinneil Sgoinneil is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Posts: 187
I would go with "Bi" rather than "Bithibh" (pronounced approximately like "biiyiv") as its more direct (Its the informal form of the imperative). Bi air faiceall ... really means "Keep an eye on ..." "(be on look out for ...") and the B is pronounced almost like in English but with a slight P sound. Ill add some links to good websites for learning how to pronounce Gaelic.

Last edited by Sgoinneil; 17th July 2011 at 06:14.
Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On



All times are GMT +1. The time now is 12:22.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.7.6
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO 3.0.0 RC4 © 2006, Crawlability, Inc.