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Scottish terms of endearment

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Old 9th April 2006, 14:28
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Celyn Celyn is offline
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Where are "hinny" and "henny" said? I have never heard either as a Scottish word.
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Old 9th April 2006, 15:05
ANDY-J3 ANDY-J3 is offline
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They are archaic words and the only place you will find them nowadays is in a Scots dictionary.
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Old 9th April 2006, 17:08
Polwarth Polwarth is offline
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BUT..... the eejit wants current slang; or so he says...
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Old 9th April 2006, 17:10
Polwarth Polwarth is offline
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And. according to this, I'm right -it is a Geordie word, still in current use.
http://www.thenortheast.fsnet.co.uk/...Dictionary.htm
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Old 9th April 2006, 17:10
ANDY-J3 ANDY-J3 is offline
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I've tried to explain to him the difference between Scots and modern Scottish slang but it's like talking to a brick wall.
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Old 9th April 2006, 17:16
ANDY-J3 ANDY-J3 is offline
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Originally posted by Polwarth

And. according to this, I'm right -it is a Geordie word, still in current use.
http://www.thenortheast.fsnet.co.uk/...Dictionary.htm



It is a word found in Scots and Geordie although it is currently used only in the latter, and it shows the common origins of the two because Hinnie and Hennie are both derived from the Old English word Henn. I've seen hinnie used once, in a text from the seventeenth century from south Ayrshire so perhaps its usage was confined to that area.
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Old 9th April 2006, 23:33
Polwarth Polwarth is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ANDY-J3
I've tried to explain to him the difference between Scots and modern Scottish slang but it's like talking to a brick wall.
Exactly.... the numpty keeps asking the same questions... again... and again... and again....

I'm almost totally convinced he's a troll.
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