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Interesting article on the Anglicisation of the Scots

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Old 17th July 2011, 14:19
ANDY-J3 ANDY-J3 is offline
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But surely the phrase "Anglicisation of the Scots" doesn't suggest that you are referring specifically to language. When we talk about Romanisation of the Britons we think of them embracing Roman culture and becoming Romano-Britons. By the same token when you talk about Anglicisation of the Scots it conveys an image of them rejecting their unique sense of Scottish national identity and becoming Anglo-Scots which would be historically inaccurate.
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Old 17th July 2011, 14:22
Sgoinneil Sgoinneil is offline
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Well what would you call it? You could say the Anglophonisation but Anglicisation is the normal term for the changes that took place. If you check the other thread I started lower down, you will find an article by Dauvit Brown that covers the same ground. ou could call it the Scotticisation of English in Scotland iof you prefer, though that would be more contentious I would imagine.
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Old 17th July 2011, 14:24
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tig tig is offline
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Anglophonisation???????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????? ????? WTF?


SG what part of the world are you from?

try n pick the country you ACTUALLY live
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Old 17th July 2011, 14:27
Sgoinneil Sgoinneil is offline
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When Did Scotland Become Scotland? | History Today

Perhaps this article is less contentious.
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Old 18th July 2011, 12:50
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Lachlan09 Lachlan09 is offline
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At last - some spiky debate and wrankling on the site ! It was getting so sleepy and bereft of life, I thought the old worthies had gone !

I still miss Wullie M ! Where are you ??
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Old 18th July 2011, 23:25
JCfromGA JCfromGA is offline
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Andy... I leave for a while and see you're still brawling!! Evening to you!!!
Yeah, where is Wullie Bear? Sorry guys, my life has been insane... so no time for forums.

I'm not going to read that article.. seems from what I read, it's bound to offend one person or another.

Wouldn't you say, that to many who live outside of Scotland... there is this idea of a homogeneous Scottish culture? That people historically drank whisky, wore kilts, ate haggis, and spoke Gaelic? That perception may be due to the mass immigration out of the Gaelic communities of Scotland. If you understand that Scotland has a huge geographical area that not only kept invaders from other countries out... but also created a division among the people living there for centuries... it's doubtful that there would be a homogeneous culture.

Hope this message finds everyone well!!
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Old 19th July 2011, 06:22
Sgoinneil Sgoinneil is offline
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I agree, Scottish culture certainly wasnt homogenous. Sutherland Gaelic was nearer to Modern Irish in some of its aspects than Argyle Gaelic (which is nearer to the Ulster variety) and nobody is sure how Gaels in Fife or East Lothian would have communicated. However we can say that kilts and haggis played less of a role in everyone's ideas about being Scottish than St Columba and the Gaelic language did. Homogeneity has never been a part of traditional Gaelic community and nor should it be represented as nowadays. This is a major bone of contention between academics and native speakers.
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