Go Back   Scotland Discussion Forum > Culture > History

Notices


The origin of the Scottich

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread Rating: Thread Rating: 2 votes, 5.00 average. Display Modes
  #29 (permalink)  
Old 23rd June 2006, 20:10
Veniconi Veniconi is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Wester Ross, sort of...
Posts: 13
Talking

Quote:
Originally Posted by ANDY-J3
I had a look at it and it seems reasonably accurate and well written to me with an extensive list of reference sources.
Okay. Relevance is in the eye of the beholder, I s'pose I find myself unable to subscribe to Wiki's Picts being part of the great Celtic wave idea. It makes more sense to have had them already in Pictland at the time of
the Scotti's arrival into Alba.

I know that there is no concrete way, save for relying on the often-
biased/stinted relations by Roman/Greek philsophers, etc, as the Picts
until near the end of their 'official span' used oral tradition to carry the
people' history.

As for reference sources, well whatever floats your boat .
As is becoming clear from our US cousins - put enough similarly-biased
people together, and cite only their output, and strangely enough...

(that is in no way an attack on you or your post, Andy! !)


Cheers!

- Ven
Reply With Quote
  #30 (permalink)  
Old 23rd June 2006, 20:45
our-scotland our-scotland is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Posts: 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by Veniconi
It makes more sense to have had them already in Pictland at the time of the Scotti's arrival into Alba.
I've read the wiki article on the Picts and at no point does it say the Picts were not here at the time the Scotti arrived. After all, they were given their name by the Romans and they were here before the Scotti arrived.

However, the Picts had to come from somewhere and it is believed (and not only by the author of the wiki article) that they migrated across Europe. Of course, by the time of the Romans and later Scotti they had probably been here for many (thousands of?) years - probably from around the time the land became habitable following the last ice age!
Reply With Quote
  #31 (permalink)  
Old 2nd July 2006, 22:02
Eleana Eleana is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Posts: 803
Quote:
Originally Posted by Celyn
Quote:
Originally Posted by Houssine
............you say like me the green for the celts is important colour look the name of "GLASGOW" glas is the green.
Not grey?
glas and gorm are typical expressions of a Gaelic mindset. Gorm can be both blue and green for natural things and always mean bright, lush as well.
glas is the opposite dull greyish.

Adhar gorm agus feur gorm blue sky and green grass
feur glas dull, grey grass
falt glas dull, grey hair
falt liath bright grey, white hair

Only grey, blue, green, red/brown show these distinctions (or have I forgotten one?). Clear as mud?
__________________
'S toil leam Gàidhlig a bhruidhinn agus a leughadh agus sgrìobhadh oir 'se an cànan feumail agus àlainn a th' innte.
Reply With Quote
  #32 (permalink)  
Old 3rd July 2006, 09:18
ANDY-J3 ANDY-J3 is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Grangemouth.
Posts: 1,751
There is differing opinion as to whether the name Glasgow is of Brythonic or Gaelic origin although given its location in what was formerly the heartland of the Britons I think the former is more likely, and the Brythonic translation would be glas (green-blue) and cau (hollow), as opposed to the Gaelic "dear green place".
__________________
"Our scientific power has outrun our spiritual power. We have guided missiles and misguided men."

- Martin Luther King Jr.
Reply With Quote
  #33 (permalink)  
Old 4th July 2006, 16:02
Eleana Eleana is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Posts: 803
Sorry Andy, I repeat, glas is not simply green in Gaidhlig. It's also describing a state or condition which is not favourable for grass. Therefore I don't understand where "Dear Green Place" should come from. Anything to enlighten me?

The Brythonic glas should have the same feel than the Goidelic one, shouldn't it?
__________________
'S toil leam Gàidhlig a bhruidhinn agus a leughadh agus sgrìobhadh oir 'se an cànan feumail agus àlainn a th' innte.
Reply With Quote
  #34 (permalink)  
Old 4th July 2006, 16:24
ANDY-J3 ANDY-J3 is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Grangemouth.
Posts: 1,751
Eleana,
The dear green place has always been the accepted translation of Glasgow. There isn't any source dealing with its Gaelic translation that defines it otherwise so I don't know why there is any misunderstanding.
__________________
"Our scientific power has outrun our spiritual power. We have guided missiles and misguided men."

- Martin Luther King Jr.
Reply With Quote
  #35 (permalink)  
Old 4th July 2006, 16:53
SherbrookeJacobite
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
I think grey and dull are more accurate in a modern context than green . Maybe the translation should be the dear dull grey place.
Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On



All times are GMT +1. The time now is 02:27.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.7.6
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO 3.0.0 RC4 © 2006, Crawlability, Inc.