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Gàidhlig Kitchen Vocabulary

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  #15 (permalink)  
Old 17th January 2011, 19:44
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similar to when you hoover with your dyson
... and yet it isn't really because Hoover was the name of a company; the word hoover become synonymous with "vacuum cleaner" over here due to that company's dominance in the market place and even now a dyson is referred to as a hoover! Having said that, I do get your point about brevel (or should that be Breville?), which is more than I can say about the OP's comments!
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Old 17th January 2011, 19:54
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ye it should be breville...i didnt bother to stick my head in the kitchen to see

somebody asked me once to name all the hoover/breville/biro type brand names in common use.....

cant remember any more at the mo tho....google maybe


1...2....3....go
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Old 17th January 2011, 22:39
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SeamusAlba,

I admire your valiant efforts in single-handedly juggling several threads at once and I agree with much of what you write. It’s all been said before to no avail. The one thing I would caution you on though is to take it steady on the Gaelic, it depresses me to see it so horribly ravaged.

Nobody I know has a river of loaves in their kitchen
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Old 18th January 2011, 01:03
SeamusAlba SeamusAlba is offline
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SeamusAlba,

I admire your valiant efforts in single-handedly juggling several threads at once and I agree with much of what you write. It’s all been said before to no avail. The one thing I would caution you on though is to take it steady on the Gaelic, it depresses me to see it so horribly ravaged.

Nobody I know has a river of loaves in their kitchen
Tha mi duiilich Crofter. Se oileneach a tha annam fhathast ach bi mi deseal ri ag ionnssaghadh barrachd. Feumaidh mi ag obair air mo faclan, tha sin ceart is cha toil leum a sgriobhadh cearr do chànan earachdail



I meant bread oven, I must have misspelled it

Crofter, a bheil thu cinnteach nach robh mi a sgriobadh àmhainn? Beachd mi gum bheil facal "abhainn" sin a canar "river" anns a Bheurla? Chan eil mi ag iarraidh a bris Gàidhlig ged a sgriobh mi tric uabhasach
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Old 18th January 2011, 03:18
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Whats the Lallans for them?
I haven't the foggiest. Don't speak it, don't write it, don't think in it.


Who knows, perhaps in 20 years, Mandarin (Putonghua) will have become the international language of business and power !
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Old 18th January 2011, 08:31
SeamusAlba SeamusAlba is offline
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I haven't the foggiest. Don't speak it, don't write it, don't think in it.


Who knows, perhaps in 20 years, Mandarin (Putonghua) will have become the international language of business and power !

maybe. However, Gaelic has no more borrowings than Engliash. Take a look at such terma as entente cordial, perastroika and of course clock (from Gaelic). It entered German as Glocke (bell) via the missionaries from Iona.

Gaelic uses Arabic derived terms like "chemist" (from al kimiyya/alchemy) and Latin-Greek hybrids like telibhisean.
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Old 18th January 2011, 10:06
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maybe. However, Gaelic has no more borrowings than Engliash. Take a look at such terma as entente cordial, perastroika and of course clock (from Gaelic). It entered German as Glocke (bell) via the missionaries from Iona.

Gaelic uses Arabic derived terms like "chemist" (from al kimiyya/alchemy) and Latin-Greek hybrids like telibhisean.
Talking about borrowing in the kitchen, can I borrow a cup of sugar ?
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