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Old 7th March 2006, 19:21
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Not_Just_DNA Not_Just_DNA is offline
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Chicken livers is probably the least favorite of anything my wacky family has ever made.

Chocolate ants, would not do it again.

Octopus, not too bad, just different with strange texture.
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Old 7th March 2006, 21:35
SherbrookeJacobite
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I have eaten just about everything mentioned above - and must say, that for someone growing up in a Maritime area - things like octopus and eel don't seem wierd. Eel is very good - tastes a lot like mackeral. Octopus is much like squid (calamari). I once ate a choclate covered cricket (not bad - reminded me of a choclate covered raisin, just a bit crunchier). Never eaten cat (that I know of - but I am partial to chinese food so...). I find the idea of eating frogs kind of strange. I have eaten rattlesnake - which was actually quite good. Ostrich, Bison, Horse - all very good. Bear - I really wasn't crazy about - it had a bit of a strong taste. Marmite - must be an acquired taste. People in the area where I live find my fondness for black pudding strange - and they eat prairie oysters (bull testicles) - (which I haven't yet tried, and probably won't!).
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Old 8th March 2006, 03:01
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I am not sure if they are prepared the same (around here they are deep fried) and we call them Rocky Mountain Oysters. I like to try lots of different things, but despite it being somewhat popular and deep fried to look like, well, just about anything else that's been deep fried I still can't bring myself to eat it!
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Old 8th March 2006, 04:19
HollyElise HollyElise is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Not_Just_DNA
Chicken livers is probably the least favorite of anything my wacky family has ever made.

Chocolate ants, would not do it again.

Octopus, not too bad, just different with strange texture.
I heard chocolate ants are a lot like Raisinettes... that ants even have the same acid in them as raisins. I haven't had them, but my dad did when he was in South America.
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Old 8th March 2006, 04:38
HollyElise HollyElise is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SherbrookeJacobite
I have eaten just about everything mentioned above - and must say, that for someone growing up in a Maritime area - things like octopus and eel don't seem wierd. Eel is very good - tastes a lot like mackeral. Octopus is much like squid (calamari). I once ate a choclate covered cricket (not bad - reminded me of a choclate covered raisin, just a bit crunchier). Never eaten cat (that I know of - but I am partial to chinese food so...). I find the idea of eating frogs kind of strange. I have eaten rattlesnake - which was actually quite good. Ostrich, Bison, Horse - all very good. Bear - I really wasn't crazy about - it had a bit of a strong taste. Marmite - must be an acquired taste. People in the area where I live find my fondness for black pudding strange - and they eat prairie oysters (bull testicles) - (which I haven't yet tried, and probably won't!).
Yeah, i heard Prairie Oysters have a very strong smell and taste... not sure i could do it. I want to try rattlesnake, i heard it's good. I've never seen eel available around here, but i'll have to look for it after what you've said!

I think you're right about there being regional ideas of what is weird or normal. Around here we have a lot of vegans, vegetarians, and people with unusual diet restrictions.... so i've eaten a lot of things i think of as normal but other people might not... tofu, tempeh, seitan, soymilk, rice milk, rice milk ice cream, soy cheese, rice cheese, flax seed, tofupups, fakinbacon, quinoa... Amaranth, Spelt, and other non-wheat flours (i've baked a lot of non-wheat breads, too), ....vegan marshmallows and vegan butter, spirulina, wheat grass, just about anything sprouted, fermented rice, hmmm.... i'm sure i'll start remembering a lot more. People drink a lot of weird juices... i can't remember the names... i have pomegranite juice right now (known for it's anti-oxidants), but that's not too weird, is it?
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Old 8th March 2006, 08:33
Lithgae Lithgae is offline
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My work colleagues believe just about everything i eat is weird, but it's mainly because i never heat anything up. If i bring food / leftovers from home (like lasagne or pasta or chilli or whatever) i just eat it cold, and they constantly express their disgust at that.

The other thing is that i keep a wee jar of peanut butter and a supply of plastic spoons in my desk drawer, and if i get peckish during the day, i take out the jar and eat a couple of spoonfuls. The looks i get!! But hey... it's a good source of protein, and it's quick and easy... and it tastes nice!
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Old 8th March 2006, 13:09
ANDY-J3 ANDY-J3 is offline
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It's not only regional variations but preferences change through time. I have seen eel traps from Victorian times which indicate that in the not too distant past eels must have been eaten in Scotland,whereas now it is almost unheard of for Scots to eat them. Probably the strangest thing I like is a Thai fish sauce called Nam Pla which is made by mixing anchovies and other small fish with salt and leaving them to fester for a couple of months in a barrel and then draining off the juices. I would recommend anyone who likes oriental stir frys to try it as an alternative to Soy sauce,although it's very salty and not to everyone's taste.
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