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Fraud . Steven L. Akins of that Ilk.

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  #15 (permalink)  
Old 14th January 2011, 16:36
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because the people in the know know your spouting lies thats why
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Old 14th January 2011, 16:45
Duthill Duthill is offline
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More accounts of fraudulent documents that were peddled by the racist fraudster Steven L. Akins .
Part 2

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Now we enter the realm of Magic (tm)

We learn of the "instruments for working Magic" which for all the world to me looks like typical Cerimonial magic. The Slea Luin (spear of Lugh) for air, except it is a druids want (and also the Spear of Lugh as one of the treasures of the Tuatha is more akin to Fire than air). The Claiomh Solais (Sword of Nuada) but really a cerimonial knife (athme) which of the four hallows would be air. The Corie Anseasc (the Cauldron of the Dagda, and yeah water would work here) but really a challace in Akins eyes, and lastly the Lia Fail, stone of Kings, here Akins says a stone with a pentagram and Ogham will do.

Next chapter a Circle of Conjuration. Yep we have a Peentagram. Two things should be noted, the Irish did not seem to raise circles for magic and they did NOT use Pentagrams.

We get a chapter of an invocation to the Goddess (Danu in her new role as a moon goddess). Then in chapter 23 we get the old chestnut of Uil-ioc (all heal or Mistletoe in Gaelic, MODERN Gaelic). Here we even have the "golden Sickle" line of Caesar's! A few points. Mistletoe was not native to Ireland till the 18th century. Gold could not cut misltetoe as it is to soft to hold an edge, and mistletoe is too tough to let it keep any shape. Clearly this is a fabriaction building off of a well known but aporaphil Roman account. Next we will get the story of Snakes eggs....

We next get an incantation for fire how to make insnse, and the oil of enlightenment. Before Chapter 23 on making mens or Talismans. Neither are Gaelic (old or new) words, and Lamen are the toys of Cerimonial magicians!

We get a sampling of ritjuals for the 4 fire festivals, but some how that Cerna dude gets in. Damn party crasher! Also a consectration of the Child. Oh and a spell to inhabit the mind of an animal! A love spell, and the making of effigies (aka a poppet of Vudoo doll!) Lastly a spell against the evil eye (wow the Gypsies got th Irealand that long ago?). Ok this is typical neopagan toys. But I would say in the place of the "effigy" one would authentically use a brain ball (the brain of an enemy coated in many layers of herbs and lime, which cause it to shrink, then fired via a sling at a family member of the brain's former owner). It's not very legal, but very authentic

This is where the book ends.

IT is a very poorly disguised fabrication, which borrows from many sources, with no citation, no scholarship, and no Imbas!

Amazon.com: Customer Reviews: The Lebor Feasa Runda: A Druidic Grammar of Celtic Lore and Magic
The typos aside , that is a very good review .
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Old 14th January 2011, 16:54
Auld Chiel Auld Chiel is offline
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Originally Posted by Duthill View Post
Part 2



The typos aside , that is a very good review .

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Cerimonial magic
Quote:
it is a druids want
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but really a cerimonial knife (athme)
Quote:
Clearly this is a fabriaction building off of a well known but aporaphil Roman account.
I find it rather difficult to put illiteracy like that aside under the pretext of a book review. The whole notion of someone so grossy ignorant attempting to review the work of a published author is absurd in the extreme.
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Old 14th January 2011, 17:05
Duthill Duthill is offline
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Another review , just for balance

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I can't add much to Gareth's excellent review, but I would like to say that this book is a waste of time and money. The psuedo-archaic writing style is painful to read, rather reminiscent of the King James Bible. Beyond that there is a lot of non-Celtic material mixed in which clashes with extant Celtic sources, and the clear threads of Celtic material are not credited.
Particularly troublesome to me is the use of charms and prayers from the first two volumes of Carmina Gadelica, Vol. I & II: Hymns and Incantations (Forgotten Books) slightly re-written to be pagan without any acknowledgement of the true source of the material which could not possibly be a "secret" manuscript that would predate the Gadelica by almost three thousand years. It is beyond belief that nearly three millenia later the charms and prayers would have translated word for word the same from different sources and that Akins personal translation from German would be word for word identical to Carmichael's from Scottish to English from 1900. To give a sample of this on page 148 of the Lebor Feasa Runda "The wicked who would do me harm / May his throat be diseased / Globularly, spirally, circularly / Fluxy, pellety, horny-grim" now compare that to the opening lines of charm 193 from volume 2 of the Carmina Gadelica printed in 1900, page 155, "The wicked who would do me harm / May he take the throat disease / Globularly, spirally, circularly / Fluxy, pellety, horny-grim.". This clear, obvious, plagierism cannot be defended, and this is only a small sample of the many such occurances throughout this book.
I would not care if Akins had simply published this as his own personal inspiration with credit to his sources, but I think plaigerism is simply wrong and cannot be justified away with appeals to spiritual inspiration. A core druidic principle is Truth. I also find it disturbing that in his recipe for "oil of enlightenment" he repeats a medieval witches flying ointement that includes toxic ingredients, some of which can be absorbed through the skin. Were anyone to follow his recipe for this oil and use it they could easily poison themselves, yet at no point does Akins mention that any of these plants are poisonous or require special handling.
For those seeking to learn druidic religion and magic there are much better books out there

Amazon.com: The Lebor Feasa Runda: A Druidic Grammar of Celtic Lore and Magic (9781440102820): Steven Akins: Books
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Old 14th January 2011, 17:20
Auld Chiel Auld Chiel is offline
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Here are a few more reviews on my book from the Barnes & Noble book merchant website:

Quote:
An Astounding Revealation of Celtic Pagan Beliefs and Practices by Kevin O'Mally:

This is a book that every person interested in Celtic Pagan religion should read and own, it is very much a "bible" of the Druid religion. Fully one half of it is devoted to the ancient Irish sagas, many of which may already be familiar to some, but here they are told in their original pre-Christian form, unaltered by the monastic influence seen in the later versions dating to the Middle Ages. Because this translation has been made from the earliest versions of the Celtic mythological cycle, it is far easier to follow and understand, as it is free of the inconsistancies and confused texts of the later Christian-era redactions. The second half of the book is an explaination of the beliefs, philosophy and religious practices of the Druids, covering a wide variety of subjects ranging from Celtic astrology, the Ogham alphabet, the ancient Gaelic calendar and the seasonal festivals observed by the Druids. I believe that this book is truly the Rosetta Stone which can serve to reconnect us to the ancient heritage of our Celtic ancestors.
Quote:
By far the most significant text on Druidism ever published, by Brendan McGuire:

For those who have long wished that historians might one day uncover some ancient forgotten text containing all the secret teachings and doctrines of the Druids recorded in the form of a sacred scripture, the Lebor Feasa Runda certainly seems to be a dream come true. While there are currently dozens of books in print that offer readers a brief summary of the role of ancient Druids as priests and magicians of the Celts, no other book comes as close to being a veritable "bible" of the Druidic religion in the way that the Lebor Feasa Runda does. Part chronicle of the creation myth and epic sagas of the Celts and their gods, part working grimoire giving comprehensive and detailed instructions on summoning the Celtic deities to aid the practioner in the working of magic, the Lebor Feasa Runda is unique in its status as a divinely inspired pagan scripture. Filling the long existing void for such a work that modern pagans have always hoped would someday surface, the history behind its survival and rediscovery is as intriguing as the text itself; leading to DaVinci Code-like conspiracy theories regarding the events which surround its journey from a pre-Christian Irish manuscript to influencing Nazi ideologies of World War II era Europe. The Lebor Feasa Runda is a must read for anyone wishing to gain true, in depth knowledge of Druidic beliefs and practices in a way that no other book to date has even come close to.
Quote:
An Exceptional View Into the World of Druids, by Iain Farquharson:

Anyone who has browsed through the metaphysical and occult section of a bookstore looking for more than just the usual handbook or guide to the religious and magical traditions of Paganism has probably noticed that very little can be found in the way of actual sacred texts of the type which form the basic foundations of other faiths. While other religions have made their own scriptures readily available, the follower of the Pagan path has been faced with a noticeable absence of anything approaching a published doctrine concerning the spiritual tenants of their creed, until now.

With the release of The Lebor Feasa Runda: A Druidic Grammar of Celtic Lore and Magic, Steven Akins, the translator of this recently discovered historic text has brought to the forefront of Pagan religious literature what many scholars have long considered to be forever lost to the distant ages of antiquity.

When reading The Lebor Feasa Runda, the reader is immediately transported into the mysterious and magical world of the Druids, the keepers of the ancient knowledge and wisdom of the Celts. Unlike other books by current Neo-Pagan writers, The Lebor Feasa Runda is not a vague overview lightly touching on the generalities of the Druid religion and offering questionable hypothesis as to their role in Celtic Society - far from it. The Lebor Feasa Runda is a holy book of the religion itself, chronicling both the history of the Celts and their gods, as well as revealing the means by which the Druids engaged in spiritual communion with their deities. All in all, it is not a work to be taken lightly, but one to be respected and revered as a religious scripture sacred to those who are faithful to the old ways.
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  #20 (permalink)  
Old 14th January 2011, 17:49
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judging by the made up names hes got his mates to write them...if he has any left
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  #21 (permalink)  
Old 14th January 2011, 19:11
Auld Chiel Auld Chiel is offline
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judging by the made up names hes got his mates to write them...if he has any left
What have you published lately?
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