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Enjoy the Attractions of Glasgow Green

Glasgow Green is a large public park located on the north bank of the River Clyde. Having been granted by King James II to the people of Glasgow under the care of Bishop William Turnbull in 1450, the park is the oldest of its kind in the city, although it took a lot of work over an extended period of time to develop it into the landscaped treasure it is today, where visitors can enjoy the wide open stretches of well-tended lawns, stroll along the network of pathways and appreciate the architecture and history of its landmarks, including the People's Palace and Winter Gardens, the Doulton Fountain, the Nelson Monument, the McLennan Arch, St Andrews Suspension Bridge and Templeton on the Green.

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Features

MCS: Conserving Scotland's Marine Life

A recent call by the Marine Conservation Society (MCS) for measures to protect habitats supporting Scotland's marine animals received a great deal of public support through the charity's new Sea Champions volunteering initiative. Up to 3,750 pledges of support from the public for thirty-three Marine Protected Areas were gathered and later handed over to the Scottish Government's Cabinet Secretary for Rural Affairs and the Environment, Richard Lochhead. The proposed Marine Protected Areas (MPA) have been identified as 'safe havens' for sea life, offering protection from what has been defined as 'damaging activities' by humans, with littering being an enormous problem.

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Features

Edinburgh's Scottish National Portrait Gallery

Housed in an historic red sandstone building designed by Scottish architect Sir Robert Rowand Anderson, the Scottish National Portrait Gallery was established in 1882, moving into the newly completed building on Queen Street, Edinburgh, in 1889, thereby becoming the first gallery in the world to be built exclusively for the purpose of displaying portraits. The building itself was generously donated by philanthropist and owner of The Scotsman newspaper, John Ritchie Findlay. Today the gallery offers visitors the opportunity to view Scotland's history through the works of Scottish and international artists who captured the influential figures of the day on canvas.

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Features

Enjoy the Tranquility of Pittencrieff Park

Pittencrieff Park was given as a gift by Andrew Carnegie to the people of his hometown, Dunfermline, in 1903. Referred to locally as "The Glen", the park offers beautifully manicured gardens and pathways between towering trees, as well as playgrounds for children and a large greenhouse. The main gates, located on the north-east of the park, were built in 1928 and named for Carnegie's wife, Louise, and a prominent statue of the generous patron is positioned on the northern boundary.

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Features

Relish Simple Pleasures in the 'Year of Natural Scotland'

With 2013 designated as the 'Year of Natural Scotland' and CNN declaring Scotland to be its top travel destination choice for 2013, travelers who have considered visiting this ruggedly beautiful country may want to make 2013 the year to do so. The fact that the latest Bond movie, Skyfall, was filmed in Glencoe, certainly helped bring some of the spectacular scenery Scotland is known for to the attention of a broader public, and with a host of special events and activities planned, visitors will be spoiled for choice.

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Features

Spectacular Sea Eagles on the Isle of Skye

Considered to be a close cousin of the North American Bald Eagle, the White-tailed Eagle, or Sea Eagle, is one of the largest birds of prey found in Scotland and is the fourth largest bird of prey in the world with their average wingspan (2.18m/7.2ft) being the largest of any eagle. Sometimes referred to as 'flying barn doors' due to their size, Sea Eagles were eradicated from the United Kingdom over a century ago as they posed a threat to livestock and were notorious for capturing sheep and carrying them away. In recent years the Royal Society for the Protection of Birds has been instrumental in reintroducing the species, bringing birds from Norway to Scotland. There are reportedly 57 breeding pairs in Scotland at present, with 12 of these pairs resident on the Isle of Skye, where they are a popular attraction.

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Features

Scottish Philanthropist Andrew Carnegie

Widely regarded as one of the most important philanthropists of his era, Andrew Carnegie was born in a small cottage in Dunfermline, Scotland, on 25 November 1835, and was named after his grandfather. With the country going through hard times, his father, William Carnegie, decided to move his family to the United States in 1848, where they settled in Allegheny, Pennsylvania. Andrew started work at age 13, as a bobbin boy, changing spools of thread in a cotton mill for twelve hours a day, six days a week, while his father earned money weaving and peddling linens and his mother Margaret supplemented the family income by binding shoes.

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Features

Henry Bell – Steamboat Pioneer

Scottish engineer Henry Bell (1767-1830) is credited with pioneering the development of Europe's first successful passenger steamboat service, a paddle steamer named PS Comet, which ran between Greenock and Glasgow on the River Clyde in 1812. As early as 1800, Bell had unsuccessfully attempted to persuade the British Admiralty to consider funding research into the viability of using steam power to propel ships, with the vision of being able to propel vessels 'against winds and tides' as he noted in his writings at the time. Having studied the work of fellow Scotsman William Symington and corresponded with American engineer Robert Fulton, Henry Bell went ahead with his goal of building a steam-powered vessel, the PS Comet.

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